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Implications of the Growing Use of Wireless Telephones for Health Care Opinion Polls

Authors

  • Joel C. Cantor,

    1. Center for State Health Policy, Rutgers University, 55 Commercial Avenue, 3rd Floor, New Brunswick, NJ 08901,
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    • Address correspondence to Joel C. Cantor, Sc.D., Center for State Health Policy, Rutgers University, 55 Commercial Avenue, 3rd Floor, New Brunswick, NJ 08901; e-mail: jcantor@ifh.rutgers.edu. Susan Brownlee, Ph.D., is with the Center for State Health Policy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ. Cliff Zukin, Ph.D., is with the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ. John M. Boyle, Ph.D., is with the Abt SRBI Government Services Division, Silver Spring, MD.

  • Susan Brownlee,

    1. Center for State Health Policy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ,
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  • Cliff Zukin,

    1. John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • John M. Boyle

    1. Abt SRBI Government Services Division, Silver Spring, MD.
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Abstract

Objective. To assess the effect of wireless telephone substitution in a survey of health care reform opinions.

Data Source. Survey of New Jersey adults conducted by landline and wireless telephones from June 1 to July 9, 2007.

Study Design. Eighty-one survey measures are compared by wireless status. Logistic regression is used to confirm landline–wireless gaps in support for coverage reforms, controlling for population differences. Weights adjust for selection probability, complex sample design, and demographic distributions.

Principal Findings. Significant differences by wireless status were found in many survey measures. Wireless users were significantly more likely to favor coverage reforms. Higher support for government-sponsored universal coverage, income-related state coverage subsidies, and an individual mandate remain after adjustment for demographic variables.

Conclusions. Opinion polls excluding wireless users are likely to understate support for coverage reforms.

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