Get access

Predictors of Adequate Depression Treatment among Medicaid-Enrolled Adults

Authors

  • Carrie Farmer Teh,

    1. RAND Corporation, 4570 Fifth Avenue, Suite 600, Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Address correspondence to Carrie Farmer Teh, Ph.D., RAND Corporation, 4570 Fifth Avenue, Suite 600, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: cteh@rand.org. Mark Sorbero, M.S., Mark Mihalyo, M.S.,  James Schuster, M.D., M.B.A.,  Jane N. Kogan, Ph.D., and Bradley D. Stein, M.D., Ph.D., are with the Community Care Behavioral Health Organization, Pittsburgh, PA. Charles F. Reynolds, III, M.D.,  Jane N. Kogan, Ph.D., and Bradley D. Stein, M.D., Ph.D., are with the Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA.

  • Mark J. Sorbero,

    1. Community Care Behavioral Health Organization, Pittsburgh, PA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Mark J. Mihalyo,

    1. Community Care Behavioral Health Organization, Pittsburgh, PA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jane N. Kogan,

    1. Community Care Behavioral Health Organization, Pittsburgh, PA
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • James Schuster,

    1. Community Care Behavioral Health Organization, Pittsburgh, PA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Charles F. Reynolds III,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Bradley D. Stein

    1. Community Care Behavioral Health Organization, Pittsburgh, PA
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Objective. To determine whether Medicaid-enrolled depressed adults receive adequate treatment for depression and to identify the characteristics of those receiving inadequate treatment.

Data Source. Claims data from a Medicaid-enrolled population in a large mid-Atlantic state between July 2006 and January 2008.

Study Design. We examined rates and predictors of minimally adequate psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy among adults with a new depression treatment episode during the study period (N=1,098).

Principal Findings. Many depressed adults received either minimally adequate psychotherapy or pharmacotherapy. Black individuals and individuals who began their depression treatment episode with an inpatient psychiatric stay for depression were markedly less likely to receive minimally adequate psychotherapy and more likely to receive inadequate treatment.

Conclusions. Racial minorities and individuals discharged from inpatient treatment for depression are at risk for receiving inadequate depression treatment.

Ancillary