Patient-Centered Care Categorization of U.S. Health Care Expenditures

Authors

  • Patrick Conway,

    1. Division of General Pediatrics, Hospital Medicine, Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., MLC 2011, Cincinnati, OH 45229
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    • Address correspondence to Patrick Conway, M.D., M.Sc., Division of General Pediatrics, Hospital Medicine, Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., MLC 2011, Cincinnati, OH 45229; e-mail: Patrick.Conway@CCHMC.org. Kate Goodrich, M.D., M.H.S., is with the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC. Steven Machlin, M.S., and Joel Cohen, Ph.D., are with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Center for Financing Access and Cost Trends, Rockville, MD. Benjamin Sasse, Ph.D., is with the President's Office, Midland University, Fremont, NE.

  • Kate Goodrich,

    1. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC
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  • Steven Machlin,

    1. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Center for Financing Access and Cost Trends, Rockville, MD
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  • Benjamin Sasse,

    1. President's Office, Midland University, Fremont, NE.
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  • Joel Cohen

    1. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Center for Financing Access and Cost Trends, Rockville, MD
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Abstract

Objective. To categorize national medical expenditures into patient-centered categories.

Data Sources. The 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), a nationally representative annual survey of the civilian noninstitutionalized population.

Study Design. Descriptive statistics categorizing expenditures into seven patient-centered care categories: chronic conditions, acute illness, trauma/injury or poisoning, dental, pregnancy/birth-related, routine preventative health care, and other.

Data Collection Methods. MEPS cohort.

Principal Findings. Nearly half of expenditures were for chronic conditions. The remaining expenditures were as follows: acute illness (25 percent), trauma/poisoning (8 percent), dental (7 percent), routine preventative health care (6 percent), pregnancy/birth-related (4 percent), and other (3 percent). Hospital-based expenditures accounted for the majority for acute illness, trauma/injury, and pregnancy/birth and over a third for chronic conditions.

Conclusions. This patient-centered viewpoint may complement other methods to examine health care expenditures and may better represent how patients interact with the health care system and expend resources.

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