Food Insecurity, Processes of Care, and Self-Reported Medication Underuse in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Results from the California Health Interview Survey

Authors

  • John Billimek Ph.D.,

    Corresponding author
    • Division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care and Health Policy Research Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA
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  • Dara H. Sorkin Ph.D.

    1. Division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care and Health Policy Research Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA
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Address correspondence to John Billimek, Ph.D., UCI Health Policy Research Institute, 100 Theory, Suite 110, Irvine, CA 92617; e-mail: jbillime@uci.edu

Abstract

Objective

To assess the independent association of food insecurity with processes of care and delays in filling prescriptions.

Data Source

2007 California Health Interview Survey.

Study Design

Associations of food insecurity with processes of care and delays in filling prescriptions were examined using multivariable logistic regression analyses adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, barriers to accessing care, and health status.

Data Extraction

Data were analyzed from adults currently receiving treatment for type 2 diabetes and who had seen a doctor in the prior 12 months (N = 3,401).

Principal Findings

For diabetes patients currently receiving medical care, food insecurity was not associated with lower rates of performance of recommended processes of care, but it was associated with delays in filling prescriptions (aOR = 2.15, 95 percent CI 1.25, 3.71).

Conclusions

Food insecurity may increase delays in filling prescriptions in daily life, even though the performance of recommended processes of care in the clinic is not diminished.

Ancillary