Get access

Which States Enroll Their Medicaid- Eligible, Citizen Children with Immigrant Parents?

Authors

  • Eric E. Seiber Ph.D.

    Corresponding author
    • Division of Health Services Management and Policy, Ohio State University–College of Public Health, Columbus, OH
    Search for more papers by this author

Author correspondence to Eric E. Seiber, Ph.D., Division of Health Services Management and Policy, Ohio State University–College of Public Health, 210 Cunz Hall, 1841 Neil Ave., Columbus, OH 43210; e-mail: seiber.7@osu.edu

Abstract

Objective

To identify which states achieve comparable enrollment rates for Medicaid-eligible, citizen children with immigrant and nonimmigrant parents.

Data Source

A total of 810,345 Medicaid-eligible, citizen children drawn from the 2008–2010 American Community Survey.

Study Design

This study estimates a state fixed-effects probit model of uninsured status for Medicaid-eligible, citizen children. State and immigrant family interaction variables test whether citizen children in immigrant families have a higher probability of remaining uninsured compared to children in nonimmigrant families. Simulations predict the uninsured rates for Medicaid eligible children in immigrant and nonimmigrant families and rank states by the differences between the two groups.

Principal Findings

While some states have insignificant and near zero differences in predicted uninsured rates, many states have enrollment disparities reaching 20 percent points between citizen children with immigrant and nonimmigrant parents.

Conclusions

Many states have large differences in enrollment rates between their Medicaid-eligible, citizen children with immigrant and nonimmigrant parents. Addressing these enrollment disparities could improve the health status of citizen children in immigrant families and earn Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act bonus payments for many states.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary