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How was your day? Couples’ affect when telling and hearing daily events

Authors

  • ANGELA M. HICKS,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Utah
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    • Angela M. Hicks and Lisa M. Diamond, Department of Psychology, University of Utah.

    • Angela M. Hicks is now at Department of Psychology, Westminster College.

  • LISA M. DIAMOND

    1. University of Utah
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    • Angela M. Hicks and Lisa M. Diamond, Department of Psychology, University of Utah.


  • This work was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Mental Health, 1R03MH64813-01, awarded to Lisa M. Diamond.

Angela M. Hicks, Department of Psychology, Westminster College, 1840 South 1300 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84115, e-mail: ahicks@westminstercollege.edu.

Abstract

This study examined day-to-day mood changes associated with disclosure of positive and stressful events as affect regulation within couples. In daily diaries, 48 couples cohabiting in the United States reported whether they told their partner about the most positive and stressful event of their day. Participants reported greater positive affect on days when they told their partner about the most positive event of their day. This effect was less pronounced among avoidant women. Participants also reported greater positive affect on days when their partner shared their most positive event. Sharing about stressors was not associated with greater negative affect. These findings underscore the importance of investigating affect regulation processes such as daily event disclosures from a dyadic perspective.

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