Perceived versus reported social referent approval and romantic relationship commitment and persistence

Authors

  • PAUL E. ETCHEVERRY,

    Corresponding author
    1. Southern Illinois University Carbondale
      Paul E. Etcheverry, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Department of Psychology, Life Sciences II, Room 281, Mail Code 6502, 1125 Lincoln Drive, Carbondale, IL 62901, e-mail: petch@siu.edu.
    Search for more papers by this author
      Paul E. Etcheverry, Department of Psychology, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
  • BENJAMIN LE,

    1. Haverford College
    Search for more papers by this author
      Benjamin Le, Department of Psychology, Haverford College
  • MAHNAZ R. CHARANIA

    1. University of Texas at Arlington
    Search for more papers by this author
      Mahnaz R. Charania, Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Arlington.

  • Paul E. Etcheverry, Department of Psychology, Southern Illinois University Carbondale; Benjamin Le, Department of Psychology, Haverford College; Mahnaz R. Charania, Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Arlington.

Paul E. Etcheverry, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Department of Psychology, Life Sciences II, Room 281, Mail Code 6502, 1125 Lincoln Drive, Carbondale, IL 62901, e-mail: petch@siu.edu.

Abstract

The current study examined social network influence processes on romantic relationship outcomes by obtaining the reported opinions of social referents as well as romantic relationship members’ perceptions of social network members’ opinions. Participants were 254 (151 women) college students from the United States involved in romantic relationships along with a male and female friend who all completed surveys regarding the participants’ romantic relationship. This work demonstrated that perceived normative beliefs of social network members significantly mediated the effects of reported social network approval on relationship commitment. Participants’ reports of relationship commitment were found to mediate the effect of subjective norms on relationship persistence. Along with network members’ relationship approval, participants’ satisfaction was found to predict participants’ normative beliefs.

Ancillary