Affiliation with new peer acquaintances during two initial social support interactions

Authors

  • BROOKE C. FEENEY,

    Corresponding author
    1. Carnegie Mellon University
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    • Brooke C. Feeney, Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University; Jude Cassidy, Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park; Edward P. Lemay Jr., Department of Psychology, University of New Hampshire; Fatima Ramos-Marcuse, University of Maryland School of Nursing.

  • JUDE CASSIDY,

    1. University of Maryland, College Park
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    • Brooke C. Feeney, Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University; Jude Cassidy, Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park; Edward P. Lemay Jr., Department of Psychology, University of New Hampshire; Fatima Ramos-Marcuse, University of Maryland School of Nursing.

  • EDWARD P. LEMAY JR.,

    1. University of New Hampshire
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    • Brooke C. Feeney, Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University; Jude Cassidy, Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park; Edward P. Lemay Jr., Department of Psychology, University of New Hampshire; Fatima Ramos-Marcuse, University of Maryland School of Nursing.

  • FATIMA RAMOS-MARCUSE

    1. University of Maryland School of Nursing
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    • Brooke C. Feeney, Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University; Jude Cassidy, Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park; Edward P. Lemay Jr., Department of Psychology, University of New Hampshire; Fatima Ramos-Marcuse, University of Maryland School of Nursing.


  • This research was supported by Grant 36635 from the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development to Jude Cassidy, grants from the National Institute of Mental Health (066119) and the National Science Foundation (BCS0424579) to Brooke Feeney, and the Department of Psychology of the University of Maryland at College Park. Fatima Ramos-Marcuse was supported by Grant 58907 from the National Institute of Mental Health to Jude Cassidy. We thank the adolescents who participated in this research. We also thank Nataliya Rozinskiy for her assistance with manuscript preparation, and we thank Laura Long, Lauren Lieberman-Messing, Joshua Pincus-Sokoloff, Nakiya Vasi, and Daniel Isenberg for their assistance with the coding of support-seeking and support-providing behavior. We are grateful to Mindy Rodenberg-Cabrera who supervised data collection.

Brooke C. Feeney, Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, e-mail: bfeeney@andrew.cmu.edu.

Abstract

Abstract

This investigation examined the influence of a prior social support interaction on a subsequent interaction between new peer acquaintances. Pairs of adolescent peers (recruited in a large metropolitan area in the United States) were videotaped as they met and discussed current life concerns in 2 separate interactions. Results indicated that (a) the behaviors of new interaction partners are coordinated within an interaction (social coordination hypothesis), (b) behaviors exhibited during an initial interaction predict behaviors exhibited during a subsequent interaction (influential interaction hypothesis), (c) individuals affiliate in similar ways across interactions (cross-situational consistency hypothesis), and (d) behaviors reflecting greater comfort with interaction increase across interactions (uncertainty reduction hypothesis). The discussion focuses on implications of results and contributions to existing literatures.

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