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Maintaining work-related personal ties following retirement

Authors

  • RABINA COZIJNSEN,

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    1. VU University Amsterdam
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    • Rabina Cozijnsen, Department of Sociology, VU University Amsterdam; Nan L. Stevens, Department of Sociology, VU University Amsterdam and Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen; Theo G. van Tilburg, Department of Sociology, VU University Amsterdam.

  • NAN L. STEVENS,

    1. VU University Amsterdam
    2. Radboud University Nijmegen
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    • Rabina Cozijnsen, Department of Sociology, VU University Amsterdam; Nan L. Stevens, Department of Sociology, VU University Amsterdam and Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen; Theo G. van Tilburg, Department of Sociology, VU University Amsterdam.

  • THEO G. Van TILBURG

    1. VU University Amsterdam
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    • Rabina Cozijnsen, Department of Sociology, VU University Amsterdam; Nan L. Stevens, Department of Sociology, VU University Amsterdam and Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen; Theo G. van Tilburg, Department of Sociology, VU University Amsterdam.


  • This research was partially supported by a grant from the Stichting Sluyterman van Loo Foundation. The Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam is largely supported by a grant from the Netherlands Ministry of Health Welfare and Sports, Directorate of Long-Term Care.

    Adam Davey served as the guest editor for this manuscript.

Rabina Cozijnsen, Department of Sociology, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1105, 1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands, e-mail: r.cozijnsen@fsw.vu.nl.

Abstract

This study examines the consequences of retirement for the continuation of work-related personal ties. The hypothesis is that their inclusion in personal networks after retirement has become more likely because these relationships have become less role based in today's social-cultural context. Data are from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam. Members of two cohorts born during the periods 1928–1937 (N = 109) and 1938–1947 (N = 131) were interviewed in 1992 and 2002, respectively, with a follow-up 3 years later. Among retirees, the likelihood of having work-related relationships in their personal network after retirement increased by 19% in 10 years. This suggests that retirement has become less disruptive. Retirees seem more inclined to form intrinsically rewarding work-related relationships that continue to be important following retirement.

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