Get access

Marital aggression and child peer competence: A comparison of three conceptual models

Authors

  • BRENT FINGER,

    Corresponding author
    1. State University of New York at Buffalo
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Brent Finger, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Rina D. Eiden, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Ellen P. Edwards, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Kenneth E. Leonard, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Lorig Kachadourian, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo.

  • RINA D. EIDEN,

    1. State University of New York at Buffalo
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Brent Finger, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Rina D. Eiden, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Ellen P. Edwards, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Kenneth E. Leonard, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Lorig Kachadourian, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo.

  • ELLEN P. EDWARDS,

    1. State University of New York at Buffalo
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Brent Finger, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Rina D. Eiden, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Ellen P. Edwards, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Kenneth E. Leonard, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Lorig Kachadourian, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo.

  • KENNETH E. LEONARD,

    1. State University of New York at Buffalo
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Brent Finger, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Rina D. Eiden, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Ellen P. Edwards, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Kenneth E. Leonard, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Lorig Kachadourian, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo.

  • LORIG KACHADOURIAN

    1. State University of New York at Buffalo
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Brent Finger, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Rina D. Eiden, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Ellen P. Edwards, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Kenneth E. Leonard, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo; Lorig Kachadourian, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo.


Brent Finger, Research Institute on Addictions, State University of New York at Buffalo, 1021 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, e-mail: bfinger@ria.buffalo.edu.

Abstract

This study examined longitudinal data linking marital aggression with child peer competence in kindergarten. The study compared 3 conceptual models for understanding the relation between marital aggression and child peer competence. Model 1 examines the direct effects of marital aggression, parental alcoholism, and parenting on child peer competence; Model 2 posits that this relation is mediated by child social problem-solving abilities (social information processing theory); whereas Model 3 proposes that the relation is mediated by parental warmth/ sensitivity (spillover theory). Structural equation modeling was most supportive of Models 1 and 3, indicating that parenting behavior, but not social problem solving, partially mediates the relation between marital conflict and child peer competence.

Ancillary