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Face needs, intragroup status, and women's reactions to socially aggressive face threats

Authors

  • ERIN K. WILLER,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Denver
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    • An earlier version of this manuscript was presented on the Top Three Panel of the Interpersonal Communication Division at the Western States Communication Association conference, Mesa, AZ, February 2009. The authors wish to thank Dr. Jody Koenig Kellas, Dr. James Bovaird, and the anonymous reviewers for their advice and feedback.

  • JORDAN SOLIZ

    1. University of Nebraska–Lincoln
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    • An earlier version of this manuscript was presented on the Top Three Panel of the Interpersonal Communication Division at the Western States Communication Association conference, Mesa, AZ, February 2009. The authors wish to thank Dr. Jody Koenig Kellas, Dr. James Bovaird, and the anonymous reviewers for their advice and feedback.


  • Erin K. Willer, Department of Communication Studies, University of Denver; Jordan Soliz, Department of Communication Studies, University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

Erin K. Willer, Department of Communication Studies, University of Denver, 2000 E. Asbury Avenue, 299 Sturm Hall, Denver, CO 80208, e-mail: ewiller@du.edu.

Abstract

Socially aggressive face threats (SAFTs) are messages that threaten one's identity or positive face. Given the potential negative consequences of being a recipient of such behavior, the role of positive face needs, intragroup status, and the face-threatening nature of social aggression in predicting correlates of negative affect experienced as a result of being a target of SAFTs, including the face threat of the response, forgiveness, and well-being was investigated. On the basis of the survey responses from 199 college-aged women, findings indicated that targets' positive face needs and intragroup status are directly and indirectly associated with forgiveness and overall well-being. Implications for these findings in relation to theorizing about face and intragroup identity, as well as limitations and suggestions for future research were provided.

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