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Attachment styles and relationship quality: Actual, perceived, and ideal partner matching

Authors

  • CAILEY STRAUSS,

    1. University of Manitoba, Canada
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    • Cailey Strauss, Marian M. Morry, and Mie Kito, Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Canada.

    • Cailey Strauss is now in the Department of Psychology at the University of Saskatchewan.

  • MARIAN M. MORRY,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Manitoba, Canada
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    • Cailey Strauss, Marian M. Morry, and Mie Kito, Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Canada.

  • MIE KITO

    1. University of Manitoba, Canada
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    • Cailey Strauss, Marian M. Morry, and Mie Kito, Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Canada.


  • This research was funded by a University of Manitoba research grant to M.M.M. Study 1 was conducted as part of C.S.'s bachelor of arts (honors) degree.

Marian M. Morry, Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, P508 Duff Roblin Building, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2, Canada, e-mail: Marian_Morry@UManitoba.ca.

Abstract

Attachment dimension matching in dating relationships and how matching relates to relationship quality were investigated. Across 2 studies, individuals preferred similar but more secure partners (lower anxiety and lower avoidance) as reflected by their ideals. In Study 1, greater similarity between the self and perceptions of the partner's anxiety predicted more positive relationship outcomes (e.g., relationship satisfaction, trust). Similar results were found for ideal–perceived partner avoidance similarity, whereas ideal–perceived partner anxiety similarity was less important. Study 2 involved both partners in the relationship and indicated that relationship outcomes were predicted by the actor's and partner's attachment dimensions as well as by ideal–perceived partner similarity and self–perceived partner similarity.

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