Development of a prototype-based measure of relational boredom

Authors

  • CHERYL HARASYMCHUK,

    Corresponding author
    1. Carleton University, Canada
      Cheryl Harasymchuk, Department of Psychology, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1S-5B6, e-mail: Cheryl_Harasymchuk@carleton.ca or Beverley Fehr, Department of Psychology, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3B-2E9, e-mail: b.fehr@uwinnipeg.ca.
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Cheryl Harasymchuk, Department of Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Beverley Fehr, Department of Psychology, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.

  • BEVERLEY FEHR

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Winnipeg, Canada
      Cheryl Harasymchuk, Department of Psychology, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1S-5B6, e-mail: Cheryl_Harasymchuk@carleton.ca or Beverley Fehr, Department of Psychology, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3B-2E9, e-mail: b.fehr@uwinnipeg.ca.
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Cheryl Harasymchuk, Department of Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Beverley Fehr, Department of Psychology, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.


  • Preparation of this manuscript was supported by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada grant awarded to B.F. This research was based on C.H.'s doctoral dissertation and was supported by a Doctoral Fellowship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Cheryl Harasymchuk, Department of Psychology, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1S-5B6, e-mail: Cheryl_Harasymchuk@carleton.ca or Beverley Fehr, Department of Psychology, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3B-2E9, e-mail: b.fehr@uwinnipeg.ca.

Abstract

The goal of this research was to create a self-report measure of relational boredom using a prototype approach. In the first study, 2 samples (participants in dating relationships and in marital relationships) generated features of the concept of relational boredom. In Study 2, these features were rated for prototypicality by 2 samples (dating and married). A Relational Boredom Scale was constructed by selecting those features (items) that were rated as most central to the construct. In Study 3, the reliability and validity of the scale were assessed, again with participants in dating and marital relationships. There was evidence that the Relational Boredom Scale is a psychometrically sound measurement instrument.

Ancillary