Acquiring dyadic coping: Parents and partners as models

Authors

  • SILVIA DONATO,

    Corresponding author
    1. Catholic University of Milan
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    • Silvia Donato, Raffaella Iafrate, and Eugenia Scabini, Department of Psychology, Catholic University of Milan, Milano, Italy;

  • RAFFAELLA IAFRATE,

    1. Catholic University of Milan
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    • Silvia Donato, Raffaella Iafrate, and Eugenia Scabini, Department of Psychology, Catholic University of Milan, Milano, Italy;

  • THOMAS N. BRADBURY,

    1. University of California Los Angeles
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    • Thomas N. Bradbury, Department of Psychology, University of California Los Angeles.

  • EUGENIA SCABINI

    1. Catholic University of Milan
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    • Silvia Donato, Raffaella Iafrate, and Eugenia Scabini, Department of Psychology, Catholic University of Milan, Milano, Italy;


Silvia Donato, Athenaeum Center for Family Studies and Research, Catholic University of Milan, L.go Gemelli, 1, 20123 Milano, Italy, e-mail: silvia.donato@unicatt.it.

Abstract

Using self-reported data on dyadic coping from 153 premarital couples and their parents, this study investigates (a) how similar individuals are to their parents and partner and (b) whether parent–child similarities in dyadic coping vary as a function of child's gender and the type of dyadic coping model parents represent. Similarities were computed using an idiographic approach, and 2 components of dyadic similarity—unique and stereotypical—were distinguished. Results indicate that internalization of parental models and partner's reciprocation are relevant sources of dyadic coping acquisition, that different processes are implicated in the acquisition of positive versus negative dyadic coping, and that children's gender and their ability to discriminate between parental models influence such an acquisition.

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