Ventricular Arrhythmias in Dogs With Splenic Masses

Authors

  • Minta L. Keyes D.V.M.,

    1. Department of Medicine, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, 200 Westboro Road, North Grafton, Massachusetts 01536
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  • John E. Rush D.V.M., M.S.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, 200 Westboro Road, North Grafton, Massachusetts 01536
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  • Helio S. Autran de Morais D.V.M., M.S.,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 601 Vernon L. Tharp Street, Columbus, Ohio 43210
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  • C. Guillermo Couto D.V.M.

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 601 Vernon L. Tharp Street, Columbus, Ohio 43210
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*Tuft University School of Veterinary Medicine

Summary

The records of 73 dogs with splenic masses were evaluated retrospectively to determine whether ventricular arrhythmias, in the absence of clinically apparent underlying heart disease, were a common clinical finding. Associated clinical, laboratory, and pathologic findings were evaluated to search for clinical predictors of ventricular arrhythmias. Age, breed, weight, sex, coagulation abnormalities, electrolyte abnormalities, and hemoabdomen were unrelated to the development of arrhythmias (p > 0.05). Anemia was associated with the presence of arrhythmias (p = 0.005). Myocardial necrosis (10/18) and metastatic hemangiosarcoma (3/18) were common myocardial histopathologic findings. Proposed causes for arrhythmias in dogs with splenic masses include myocardial metastases, tissue hypoxia secondary to anemia or hypovolemia, and local or systemic catecholamine release.

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