• feline;
  • hemoperitoneum;
  • liver;
  • neoplasia;
  • abdominocentesis


Sixteen cases of feline, non-traumatic hemoperitoneum were evaluated retrospectively. The median age was 5.75 years (range 1.5 - 16 years). There were eight male and eight female cats. Common presenting complaints (n=13) were anorexia (37%), lethargy (31%), and recumbency (31%). Physical examination findings (n=11) included depressed mentation (100%), hypothermia (89%), pale mucous membranes (82%), and poor quality pulses (80%). The median initial peripheral packed cell volume (n=11) was 24% (range 17-55%). In four out of six cases where abdominocentesis was performed, the packed cell volume of the abdominal fluid ranged from 18% to 24%, and matched the peripheral packed cell volume (range 15 - 26%). Some common abnormalities in the serum chemistry screens 9n=6) were elevated alanine aminotransferase in 83% (5/6) of the cats (range 55-5828 U/l) and elevated alkaline phosphatase in 50% (3/6) of the cats (range 18-402 U/l). Ten cats (63%) were euthanized, three (19%) were presented dead on arrival, two (12%) are still alive, and one (6%) were euthanized, three (19%) were presented dead on arrival, two 912%) are still alive, and one (6%) died. The causes of hemoperitoneum were hepatic neoplasia (31%), hepatic necrosis (19%), hepatic amyloidosis (13%), non hepatic neoplasia (13%), hepatopathy (6%), hepatic rupture (6%), necrotic/hemorrhagic cystitis (6%), and ruptured bladder (6%).