Mechanical Ventilation of a Dog with Pentobarbital Intoxication

Authors

  • Armelle M. de Laforcade DVM,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine 200 Westboro Road, North Grafton, MA 01536 (de Laforcade, Rozanski, Rush) and Angell Memorial Animal Hospital, 350 South Huntington Avenue Boston, MA 02130 (Good)
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  • Elizabeth Rozanski DVM, DACVECC, DACVIM,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine 200 Westboro Road, North Grafton, MA 01536 (de Laforcade, Rozanski, Rush) and Angell Memorial Animal Hospital, 350 South Huntington Avenue Boston, MA 02130 (Good)
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  • Lillian Good DVM,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine 200 Westboro Road, North Grafton, MA 01536 (de Laforcade, Rozanski, Rush) and Angell Memorial Animal Hospital, 350 South Huntington Avenue Boston, MA 02130 (Good)
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  • John E. Rush DVM, MS, DACVECC, DACVIM(Cardiology)

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Clinical Sciences Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine 200 Westboro Road, North Grafton, MA 01536 (de Laforcade, Rozanski, Rush) and Angell Memorial Animal Hospital, 350 South Huntington Avenue Boston, MA 02130 (Good)
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*Dr. John E. Rush

Summary

A 9-year old spayed female American bulldog presented 5 hours after ingesting a portion of a recently euthanized sheep carcass. The dog was comatose, intubated and manually ventilated on arrival. On physical examination, the dog had stable cardiovascular parameters but was hypothermic. Cranial nerve reflexes were absent and spinal reflexes were depressed. Mechanical ventilation was initiated and maintained for 18 hours before spontaneous respiration returned. Elevated serum pentobarbital concentration (19.1 mg/ml) confirmed pentobarbital intoxication as the cause of neurological signs. This is the first report of a dog with pentobarbital toxicity that was successfully managed with mechanical ventilation. Neurologic and functional recovery was complete and the dog was discharged 48 hours after admission. (J Vet Emerg Crit Care 2001; 11(1):33–37)

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