Get access

Resolution of severe thrombocytopenia in two standard Poodles with surgical correction of splenic torsion

Authors

  • Anne E. Stoneham DVM, DACVECC,

    1. From the Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, North Grafton, MA (Stoneham, Henderson, Toole).
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Alicia K. Henderson DVM,

    1. From the Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, North Grafton, MA (Stoneham, Henderson, Toole).
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Therese E. O'Toole DVM

    1. From the Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, North Grafton, MA (Stoneham, Henderson, Toole).
    Search for more papers by this author

Address correspondence and reprint requests to:
Dr. Stoneham, Foster Hospital for Small Animals, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, 200 Westboro Road, North Grafton, MA 01536.
E-mail: anne.stoneham@tufts.edu

Abstract

Objective: To describe the diagnosis and treatment of 2 cases of severe thrombocytopenia associated with splenic torsion and to discuss the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the thrombocytopenia.

Summary: We report 2 cases of severe thrombocytopenia associated with splenic torsion. Each dog presented with non-specific clinical signs, radiographic evidence of an intra-abdominal mass, and platelet counts of less than 25,000 platelets/μL. The diagnosis of splenic torsion was made with abdominal ultrasonography and was confirmed during exploratory laparotomy. Both dogs recovered rapidly following splenectomy. The cause of thrombocytopenia associated with splenic torsion is not fully elucidated, but may be because of either platelet sequestration within the torsed spleen, platelet consumption in disseminated intravascular coagulation, or a combination of both.

New information provided: This report provides previously unreported evidence that the degree of thrombocytopenia associated with splenic torsion may be of a severity at which primary hemostasis is compromised, and resolution of thrombocytopenia occurs after splenectomy.

Ancillary