A rodenticide exposed and bleeding Beagle dog with hereditary factor VII deficiency

Authors

  • Meredith L. Daly VMD,

    1. Department of Clinical Studies – Philadelphia, the Sections of Critical Care and Medical Genetics, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
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  • Urs Giger Dr. med. vet., DACVIM, DECVIM, DECVCP

    1. Department of Clinical Studies – Philadelphia, the Sections of Critical Care and Medical Genetics, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
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Address correspondence and reprint requests to:
Dr. Urs Giger, Department of Clinical Studies – Philadelphia, Section of Medical Genetics, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010.
E-mail: giger@vet.upenn.edu

Abstract

Objective: To report a complex presentation of an acquired and hereditary coagulopathy in a dog.

Case summary: A 5-year-old spayed female Beagle presented for lethargy, anorexia, cough, and stiff gait, and was diagnosed with a spontaneous hemothorax. The patient recovered from this bleeding episode suspected to be secondary to anticoagulant rodenticide intoxication, but was subsequently diagnosed with factor VII (FVII) deficiency, a hereditary coagulopathy. Diagnostic approach and management of FVII deficiency is described.

New or unique information provided: This paper describes an unusual presentation of an inherited hemostatic disorder. Utilization of available screening and diagnostic tools, and appropriate interpretation of test results facilitate identification and management of this inherited coagulopathy.

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