Paintball intoxication in a pug

Authors

  • Jason B. King DVM,

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, Virginia
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  • David C. Grant DVM, MS, DACVIM

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, Virginia
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  • The work was performed at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, Virginia.

  • No grants were provided and no financial conflicts of interest exist.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to:
Dr. Jason B. King, Department of Small Animal Clinical Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Mail Code 0442, Blacksburg, VA 24061. E-mail: jbking@vt.edu

Abstract

Objective: To describe a case of toxicity caused by oral ingestion of paintballs by a dog and how it was initially misdiagnosed as ethylene glycol intoxication due to similar clinical signs and a positive ethylene glycol blood test.

Case summary: A 7 year-old, 8.3 kg, female spayed Pug was referred for treatment of ethylene glycol (EG) toxicity. The patient was ataxic, disoriented, polyuric, polydipsic, and had a positive EG blood test. The patient was started on fomepizole therapy and intravenous fluids. Biochemical assays of the serum showed abnormalities that were not typical of EG toxicity. The following morning the patient defecated bright pink feces. The owner revealed that bright pink paint balls were present in the household when questioned. The patient completed fomepizole therapy and was discharged 40 hours after presentation with no clinical signs. Follow-up telephone conversations found the pet to be clinically normal 2 months after discharge. New or unique information provided: This is the first known case report of paint ball intoxication in a dog that resulted in a positive EG blood test and clinical signs similar to ethylene glycol toxicity.

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