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Splenectomy as an adjunctive treatment for dogs with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia: ten cases (2003–2006)

Authors

  • Jason Elliott Horgan DVM,

    1. From the Veterinary Specialists of South Florida, 9410 Stirling Road, Cooper City, FL 33024 (Horgan, Roberts), and College of Veterinary Medicine, the Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (Schermerhorn).
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  • Brian Keith Roberts DVM, DACVECC,

    1. From the Veterinary Specialists of South Florida, 9410 Stirling Road, Cooper City, FL 33024 (Horgan, Roberts), and College of Veterinary Medicine, the Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (Schermerhorn).
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  • Thomas Schermerhorn VMD, DACVIM

    1. From the Veterinary Specialists of South Florida, 9410 Stirling Road, Cooper City, FL 33024 (Horgan, Roberts), and College of Veterinary Medicine, the Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (Schermerhorn).
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  • Conducted at Veterinary Specialists of South Florida, 9410 Stirling Road, Cooper City, FL 33024.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to
Jason Elliott Horgan, DVM, Veterinary Specialists of South Florida, 9410 Stirling Road, Cooper City, FL 33024, USA.
Email: jason081977@aol.com

Abstract

Objective – To describe the patient population, disease severity, and outcome in dogs with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) that underwent splenectomy. To compare presurgical and postsurgical data.

Design – Retrospective case series.

Setting – Emergency clinic/referral hospital.

Animals – Ten dogs diagnosed with IMHA.

Interventions – Splenectomy in addition to standard medical management for IMHA.

Measurements – Medical records of 10 dogs with IMHA, in which a splenectomy was performed were reviewed. The population was analyzed with regards to physical and clinicopathologic data, severity, treatment, and outcome. Outcome was defined as survival at 30 days, percentage of dogs on medications at 30 days, and number of relapses documented by 30 days. The presurgical and postsurgical PCV and transfusion requirements were documented and compared for each dog.

Results – Nine of 10 dogs survived to 30 days. Four of the 9 that survived were not on any immunosuppressive medications. There were no relapses during the 30 days. The 3-day postsplenectomy PCVs were significantly higher than presplenectomy. The number of transfusions administered postsplenectomy was significantly less than those administered presplenectomy.

Conclusion – The use of splenectomy may be associated with an improved outcome in dogs with IMHA.

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