Get access

Outcome from status epilepticus after portosystemic shunt attenuation in 3 dogs treated with propofol and phenobarbital

Authors

  • Kris Gommeren DVM, DECVIM,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, 4000 Liège, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stéphanie Claeys DVM, DECVS,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, 4000 Liège, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hilde De Rooster DVM, MVM, PhD, DECVS,

    1. Department of Small Animal Medicine and Clinical Biology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Annick Hamaide DVM, PhD, DECVS,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, 4000 Liège, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sylvie Daminet DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DECVIM

    1. Department of Small Animal Medicine and Clinical Biology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author

  • The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

  • This case series was presented in part at the EVECCS Congress in Berlin, Germany, June 13, 2009.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to
Dr. Kris Gommeren, Department of Clinical Sciences, Internal Medicine of Small Animals, Veterinary Faculty, University of Liège, Boulevard de Colonster 20/B44, 4000 Liège, Belgium. Email: kris.gommeren@ulg.ac.be

Abstract

Objective – To describe outcome of treatment with propofol and phenobarbital for status epilepticus (SE) after portosystemic shunt (PSS) attenuation.

Case or Series Summary – Three dogs without preceding seizure activity, were diagnosed with a single extrahepatic PSS. Following standard preoperative medical therapy, an ameroid constrictor was placed surgically. Recovery was uneventful until spontaneous SE developed 46–96 hours after surgery. After unsuccessful seizure control with benzodiazepines, dogs were treated with a bolus of propofol followed by a propofol constant rate infusion. Phenobarbital was concurrently administered and supportive care was optimized. All dogs recovered uneventfully over the next 7–9 days. Over the following months phenobarbital was slowly tapered. All dogs have been free from antiepileptic drugs for several months, without recurrence of neurologic signs.

New or Unique Information Provided – In this case series, we describe the treatment of 3 dogs with propofol and phenobarbital for refractory SE following attenuation of a single congenital PSS. After weaning of the propofol constant rate infusion, and tapering and discontinuation of phenobarbital over the following months, all dogs experienced a complete recovery. This study provides evidence that use of propofol in combination with phenobarbital may be efficacious for management of SE in dogs after PSS surgery.

Ancillary