Retrospective Study: Trends in plasma transfusion at a veterinary teaching hospital: 308 patients (1996–1998 and 2006–2008)

Authors

  • Sara J. Snow DVM,

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.
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  • L. Ari Jutkowitz VMD, DACVECC,

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.
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  • Andrew J. Brown MA, VetMB, DACVECC

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.
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  • Presented as an abstract at the 2009 International Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Symposium, Chicago, IL.

  • The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to
Dr. L. Ari Jutkowitz, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314, USA. Email: jutkowit@cvm.msu.edu
Submitted October 29, 2009; Accepted May 20, 2010.

Abstract

Objectives – To describe changes in fresh frozen plasma (FFP) utilization over a 10-year period at a veterinary teaching hospital. To evaluate the effect of FFP administration on specific laboratory parameters.

Design – Retrospective observational study.

Setting – University teaching hospital.

Animals– Two hundred and eighty-three dogs and 25 cats.

Interventions – A hospital database search was performed for all animals receiving FFP during the study periods.

Measurements and Main Results – Medical records of patients receiving plasma transfusions from 2006 to 2008 and from 1996 to 1998 were reviewed. Data collected included indications for transfusion, transfused volume, concurrent therapies, clinicopathologic data pre- and post-transfusion, transfusion reactions, days of hospitalization, and outcome. FFP was administered to 112 dogs and 23 cats from 2006 to 2008 and to 171 dogs and 2 cats from 1996 to 1998. Significantly fewer patients received FFP for the treatment of hypoalbuminemia (2006–2008: 15% versus 1996–1998: 53%; P<0.001) or pancreatitis (2006–2008: 2% versus 1996–1998: 13%; P=0.001) and significantly more patients received FFP for coagulopathy (2006–2008: 80% versus 1996–1998: 31%; P<0.001) in the 2006–2008 group compared with the 1996–1998 group. For all patients receiving FFP, there was no difference in mean serum albumin concentration pre- and post-transfusion. Median prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were significantly decreased post FFP administration. No association was found between the volume of plasma administered and outcome.

Conclusions – FFP utilization has changed significantly over a 10-year period. FFP was used most commonly in 2006–2008 for the correction of coagulopathy. FFP administration was associated with significant reduction in prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time but did not significantly alter albumin concentration when administered at median doses of 15–18 mL/kg.

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