Spontaneous echocardiographic contrast in three dogs

Authors

  • Alan G. Ralph DVM,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314
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  • Ashley B. Saunders DVM, DACVIM,

    1. Department of Small Animal Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4474
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  • Crystal D. Hariu DVM,

    1. Department of Small Animal Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4474
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  • Mary Nabity DVM, DACVP

    1. Department of Small Animal Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4474
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  • This work was carried out at Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, 4474 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-4474.

  • The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to
Dr. Alan G. Ralph, Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314, USA. Email: ralphalan81@gmail.com

Abstract

Objective – To describe the clinical presentation and outcome in 3 dogs with spontaneous echocardiographic contrast (SEC).

Case or Series Summary – SEC was identified in 3 dogs with concurrent hyperfibrinogenemia. The dogs were diagnosed with different underlying conditions including infective endocarditis of the mitral valve (Case 1), presumptive Evan's syndrome (Case 2), and presumptive sepsis (Case 3). Various therapies were used in each case directed at their underlying condition, in addition to thromboprophylaxis that were based upon a perceived risk of thromboembolic disease. The 3 dogs in this series survived to discharge and had good outcome during the follow-up period, which ranged from 3 weeks to 7 months.

New or Unique Information Provided – SEC is considered a marker for thromboembolic disease in people and can occur in dogs in the absence of significant cardiomegaly. SEC in these 3 dogs may be related to the documented hyperfibrinogenemia. Further investigation is warranted to determine whether dogs with SEC are at an increased risk for thromboembolic complications.

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