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Outcome and toxicity associated with a dose-intensified, maintenance-free CHOP-based chemotherapy protocol in canine lymphoma: 130 cases

Authors

  • K. Sorenmo,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
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  • B. Overley,

    1. School of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
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    • Present address: CARES (Center for Animal Referral and Emergency Services), Langhorne, PA, USA

  • E. Krick,

    1. School of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
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  • T. Ferrara,

    1. School of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
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    • Present address: Med Infectious Diseases Section, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  • A. LaBlanc,

    1. School of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
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  • F. Shofer

    1. School of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
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    • Present address: Department of Emergency Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA


Dr Karin Sorenmo
Department of Clinical Studies
School of Veterinary Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
3900 Delancey Street, Philadelphia PA 19104, USA
e-mail: karins@vet.upenn.edu

Abstract

A dose-intensified/dose-dense chemotherapy protocol for canine lymphoma was designed and implemented at the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. In this study, we describe the clinical characteristics, prognostic factors, efficacy and toxicity in 130 dogs treated with this protocol. The majority of the dogs had advanced stage disease (63.1% stage V) and sub-stage b (58.5%). The median time to progression (TTP) and lymphoma-specific survival were 219 and 323 days, respectively. These results are similar to previous less dose-intense protocols. Sub-stage was a significant negative prognostic factor for survival. The incidence of toxicity was high; 53.9 and 45% of the dogs needed dose reductions and treatment delays, respectively. Dogs that required dose reductions and treatment delays had significantly longer TTP and lymphoma-specific survival times. These results suggest that dose density is important, but likely relative, and needs to be adjusted according to the individual patient's toxicity for optimal outcome.

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