Racial and ethnic variations in the epidemiology of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma in the United States

Authors

  • Luciana McLean,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Scott and White Clinic, Texas A&M University System Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USA
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  • Tushar Patel

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Scott and White Clinic, Texas A&M University System Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USA
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Tushar Patel, MBChB, Division of Gastroenterology, Scott and White Clinic, Texas A&M University System Health Science Center, College of Medicine, 2401 South 31st Street, Temple, TX 76508, USA.
Tel: +1-254–724-2489 or +1-254-724-6267
Fax: +1-254–724-8276 or +1-254-742-7181
e-mail: tpatel@medicine.tamhsc.edu

Abstract

Abstract: Background/aims: Despite the global increase in the incidence of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, regional variations occur. To assess the potential contribution of racial/ethnic factors, we assessed the epidemiology of these cancers in different racial and ethnic groups in the United States.

Methods: Disease prevalence, mortality and survival rates for different racial and ethnic groups were obtained from the surveillance, epidemiology and end results survey database.

Results: The age-adjusted prevalence was highest for Hispanics (1.22 per 100 000) and lowest for Blacks (0.3 per 100 000). Age-adjusted mortality rates were higher for American Indian/Alaska Natives and Asian/Pacific Islanders compared with other groups. However, mortality rates increased by greater than 3.5% annual for all racial or ethnic groups except for American Indian/Pacific Islanders in whom mortality rates decreased by 0.2% annually. The increase in mortality rates was greatest for Hispanic women aged between 40 and 49 years. Prevalence and survival were significantly higher in Hispanic women in contrast to gender differences observed in other groups.

Conclusions: Significant racial and ethnic variations occur in the epidemiology of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma within geographically defined regions in the United States These may reflect genetic, socioeconomic or cultural predispositions to cancer.

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