The outcomes of pregnancy in patients with cirrhosis: a population-based study

Authors

  • Abdel Aziz M. Shaheen,

    1. Liver Unit, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
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    • *Contributed equally.

  • Robert P. Myers

    1. Liver Unit, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
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    • *Contributed equally.


Correspondence
Dr Robert P. Myers, Liver Unit, University of Calgary, 6D22, Teaching, Research and Wellness Building, 3280 Hospital Drive N.W., Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 4N1
Tel: +403 592 5049
Fax: +403 592 5090
e-mail: rpmyers@ucalgary.ca

Abstract

Background: The outcomes of pregnancy in patients with cirrhosis are poorly described. Our objective was to assess obstetric outcomes in cirrhotic women and their infants from a population-based perspective.

Methods: We analysed the 1993–2005 US Nationwide Inpatient Sample database to identify obstetric hospitalizations among patients with cirrhosis (n=339) and controls matched on age, hospital and year (n=6625). The effect of cirrhosis on maternal and fetal outcomes was evaluated using regression models with adjustment for patient and hospital factors.

Results: Between 1993 and 2005, 114 antepartum and 225 delivery admissions in cirrhotic patients were identified. The estimated mean number of deliveries nationwide increased from 68 to 106 annually between 1993 and 1999 and 2000 and 2005 (P=0.0004). Patients with cirrhosis were more likely to deliver by caesarean [42 vs. 28%; adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06–1.88]. Maternal (1.8 vs. 0%; P<0.0001) and fetal mortality (5.2 vs. 2.1%; P<0.0001), antepartum admission (OR 2.97; 95% CI 2.24–3.96), and maternal (OR 2.03; 95% CI 1.60–2.57) and fetal complications (OR 3.66; 95% CI 2.74–4.88) were greater among cirrhotic patients than controls. Gestational hypertension, placental abruption and uterovaginal haemorrhage were more common in patients with cirrhosis; their infants had higher rates of prematurity and growth restriction. Hepatic decompensation occurred in 15%, including ascites in 11% and variceal haemorrhage in 5%. In women with decompensation, maternal and fetal mortality were 6 and 12% respectively.

Conclusions: Although rare, pregnancies among women with cirrhosis are increasing. Cirrhotic patients and their infants have an increased risk of obstetric complications, emphasizing the importance of close maternal–fetal monitoring during pregnancy.

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