Vault Haematoma Following Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

Authors

  • David M.B. Rosen MRACOG,

    Corresponding author
    1. Sydney Women's Endosurgery Centre and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St George Hospital, University of New South Wales
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    • 1

      Fellow in Minimally Invasive Surgery.

  • Gregory M. Cario FRCOG, FRACOG

    1. Sydney Women's Endosurgery Centre and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St George Hospital, University of New South Wales
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    • 2

      Consultant Gynaecologist.


4 Sydney Women “s Endosurgery Centre. St George Private Hospital. L South St. Kogarah, Sydney, Australia 2217.

Abstract

Summary: Thirty consecutive patients underwent transabdominal ultrasound scanning on day 2 postoperatively in order to provide data on the incidence of vaginal vault haematoma following laparoscopic hysterectomy. Details of postoperative morbidity, both inpatient and after discharge, were recorded. Results support the view that there is no significant association between the presence of vaginal vault haematoma (73%) and the incidence of posthysterectomy febrile morbidity (16.7%). Furthermore the incidence of vault haematoma after laparoscopic hysterectomy is comparable to literature figures for both abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy, whilst that of febrile morbidity is at least equivalent if not reduced for the laparoscopic approach. We believe this provides further evidence confirming the safety of the laparoscopic approach to hysterectomy.

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