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Pregnancy in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Authors

  • Neelam Aggarwal MD,

    1. Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Nehru Hospital Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
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    • 1

      Assistant Professor.

  • Harjeet Sawhney MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Nehru Hospital Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
      8 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160012, India.
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    • 2

      Associate Professor.

  • Kala Vasishta MD,

    1. Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Nehru Hospital Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
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    • 3

      Professor.

  • Seema Chopra MD,

    1. Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Nehru Hospital Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
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    • 4

      Senior Resident.

  • Pardeep Bambery MD

    1. Internal Medicine, Nehru Hospital Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
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    • 5

      Additional Professor.


8 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160012, India.

Abstract

Summary: We reviewed the obstetrical performance and outcome of 15 pregnancies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (study group) and compared them with 45 age and parity-matched normal pregnancies (control group). Eleven women (73.8%) were in remission phase and 4 (26.7%) had active disease at the time of conception. The time interval between disease diagnosis and the index pregnancy was 4.2 ± 2.5 years. Two patients with renal involvement had lupus flare-up during the antenatal period. There was no case of lupus flare-up in the postpartum period. Gestational age at delivery was significantly lower in SLE patients (35.9 ± 2.5 weeks) compared to the control group (37.4 ± 2.2 weeks). The incidence of intrauterine growth retardation was significantly higher in the SLE patients (40%). There was no case of neonatal lupus or congenital heart block.

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