Female reproductive biology of Platygaster diplosisae (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) and Aprostocetus procerae (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), two parasitoids associated with the African Rice Gall Midge, Orseolia oryzivora (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae)

Authors


Souleymane Nacro, FAO 01 bp 2540 Ouagadougou 01, Burkina Faso. Email: snacro2006@yahoo.fr

Abstract

We investigated the female reproductive system of Platygaster diplosisae (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) and Aprostocetus procerae (= Tetrastichus pachydiplosisae) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), two parasitoids associated with the African rice gall midge, Orseolia oryzivora (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). Both optical and electron microscopy were used. The female reproductive system of P. diplosisae includes two large ovaries of the meristic polytrophic-type, each composed of several tens of ovarioles. The system includes also a venomous gland that extends to a common oviduct. This gland had a filiform secretory portion, in which the epithelium was thin and surrounded a common evacuation canal. The secretory cells secrete into a large reservoir. Parasitism due to P. diplosisae is gregarious. The female reproductive system of A. procerae includes two ovaries of the meristic polytrophic-type, and each ovary has a few ovarioles. Each ovariole includes one or two oocytes, which can be seen in the vitellarium. Two accessory glands, which extend to the oviduct, are also visible. The secretory epithelium of the accessory gland is made up of a dense network of secretory cells surrounded by muscle fibers. Females of A. procerae pierce the tissues of the gall and probably deposit one egg on or close to the pupa of the midge. Aprostocetus procerae is a solitary parasitoid of the midge. The two parasitoids exploit the same host at different developmental stages. These findings improve our knowledge of the reproductive biology of these two parasitoids associated with the African rice gall midge, an important pest in Africa.

Ancillary