An alien Sennertia mite (Acari: Chaetodactylidae) associated with an introduced Oriental bamboo-nesting large carpenter bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Xylocopa) invading the central Honshu Island, Japan

Authors

  • Kazuhide KAWAZOE,

    Corresponding author
    1. Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Nihonmatsu-cho, Sakyo, Kyoto
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  • Kimiko OKABE,

    1. Department of Forest Entomology, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute (FFPRI), 1 Matsunosato, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
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  • Atsushi KAWAKITA,

    1. Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Nihonmatsu-cho, Sakyo, Kyoto
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    • Present address: Center for Ecological Research, 2-509-3 Hirano, Otsu, Shiga, 520-2113 Japan.

  • Makoto KATO

    1. Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Nihonmatsu-cho, Sakyo, Kyoto
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Kazuhide Kawazoe, JR Tokai Takashimaya Co., Ltd., 1-1-4 Meieki, Nakamura, Nagoya, Aichi, 450-6001 Japan. Email: kawazoe11@gmail.com

Abstract

Since 2006, an introduced Oriental bamboo-nesting large carpenter bee, Xylocopa tranquebarorum, has been recorded from the central Honshu Island, Japan, which is inhabited only by the endemic subspecies, Xylocopa appendiculata circumvolans. Carpenter bees (tribes Xylocopini and Ceratinini) have ecological associations with specific Sennertia spp. in all geographic regions of their distribution, thus it is worried that the introduced carpenter bee has brought non-indigenous mites into Japan. In their native ranges, X. a. circumvolans and X. tranquebarorum each has specific Sennertia mite faunas: the four Japanese Alloxylocopa bees including X. a. circumvolans have associations with S. alfkeni, while X. tranquebarorum has association with S. potanini in China (except Taiwan) and with S. horrida in South to East Asia including Taiwan. In the present study, we examined phoretic mite fauna on the introduced X. tranquebarorum, and determined whether the mites are indigenous or not based on morphological character and two gene sequences (mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer). It was found from the result of this study that the non-indigenous Sennertia mite has invaded Japan with the introduced X. tranquebarorum. We discuss geographic origin of the introduced X. tranquebarorum based on associated mite fauna and potential ecological risk caused by the introduced Xylocopa-Sennertia association.

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