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Lateglacial vegetation and palaeoenvironment in W Norway, with new pollen data from the Sunnmøre region

Authors


  • Linn Cecilie Krüger (e-mail: linn.kruger@bio.uib.no), Department of Earth Science and Department of Biology, University of Bergen, P.O. Box 7803, N-5020 Bergen, Norway; Aage Paus (e-mail: aage.paus@bio.uib.no), Department of Biology, University of Bergen, P.O. Box 7803, N-5020 Bergen, Norway; John Inge Svendsen (e-mail: john.svendsen@geo.uib.no), Department of Earth Science and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, University of Bergen, Allégaten 41, N-5007 Bergen, Norway; Anne E. Bjune (e-mail: anne.bjune@uni.no), Uni Bjerknes Centre and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Allégaten 55, N-5007 Bergen, Norway

Abstract

Krüger, L. C., Paus, A., Svendsen, J. I. & Bjune, A. E. 2011: Lateglacial vegetation and palaeoenvironment in W Norway, with new pollen data from the Sunnmøre region. Boreas, 10.1111/j.1502-3885.2011.00213.x. ISSN 0300-9483.

Two sediment sequences from Sunnmøre, northern W Norway, were pollen-analytically studied to reconstruct the Lateglacial vegetation history and climate. The coastal Dimnamyra was deglaciated around 15.3 ka BP, whereas Løkjingsmyra, further inland, became ice-free around 14 ka BP. The pioneer vegetation dominated by snow-bed communities was gradually replaced by grassland and sparse heath vegetation. A pronounced peak in Poaceae around 12.9 ka BP may reflect warmer and/or drier conditions. The Younger Dryas (YD) cooling phase shows increasing snow-bed vegetation and the local establishment of Artemisia norvegica. A subsequent vegetation closure from grassland to heath signals the Holocene warming. Birch forests were established 500–600 years after the YD–Holocene transition. This development follows the pattern of the Sunnmøre region, which is clearly different from the Empetrum dominance in the Lateglacial interstadial further south in W Norway. The Lateglacial oscillations GI-1d (Older Dryas) and GI-1b (Gerzensee) are hardly traceable in the north, in contrast to southern W Norway. The southern vegetation was probably closer to an ecotone and more susceptible to climate changes.

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