Get access

Life-history strategies of Manipora amicarum (Tabulata; Upper Ordovician; southern Manitoba, Canada)

Authors

  • BOO-YOUNG BAE,

  • DONG-JIN LEE,

  • ROBERT J. ELIAS


Boo-Young Bae [ybbybb@hanmail.net], Department of Geological Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2, and Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Andong National University, Andong 760-749, South Korea; Dong-Jin Lee [djlee@andong.ac.kr], Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Andong National University, Andong 760-749, South Korea; Robert J. Elias [eliasrj@ms.umanitoba.ca], Department of Geological Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2; manuscript received on 17/05/06; accepted on 10/12/07

Abstract

Based on detailed study of transverse serial sections, we recognize various modes of corallite increase in a multichain cateniform coral, Manipora amicarum from the Selkirk Member, Red River Formation, in Manitoba. One type of axial increase and four types of lateral increase involve normal, undamaged corallites, and one type of axial increase and one type of lateral increase occur during recovery processes of corallites damaged by sediment or bioclast influx. All but one of these types of increase are comparable to those in a single-chain coral, Catenipora foerstei, which we previously documented from the same stratigraphic unit and locality. In M. amicarum, the formation of double ranks and agglutinated patches of corallites by normal corallites, and by recovery processes following corallite damage, is common and presumably genetically controlled. Agglutinated patches originate differently in C. foerstei, occurring sporadically or temporarily in only some coralla. Average annual vertical corallum growth in M. amicarum, as indicated by cyclic fluctuations of tabularial area, is higher than in C. foerstei, which has comparatively smaller corallites. In general, annual growth in M. amicarum is positively correlated with average tabularial area, negatively correlated with frequency of damaged corallites, and is not related to the frequency of corallite increase. In C. foerstei, however, there is a positive association between annual growth rate and the frequency of increase by damaged corallites, related to episodes of sediment or bioclast influx probably generated by storms. In comparison with C. foerstei, M. amicarum has a low frequency of corallite termination and extensive partial mortality is rare. It seems that the relatively rapid overall vertical corallum growth in M. amicarum was effective for protecting the coral from unfavourable situations, possibly by maintaining the growth surface higher above the substrate than in C. foerstei. Although these two species show many similarities in the types of corallite increase, their reactions and strategies in relation to physical disturbance were quite different.

Ancillary