Sinusichnus, a trace fossil from Antarctica and Venezuela: expanding the dataset of crustacean burrows

Authors

  • LUIS A. BUATOIS,

  • OLIVER MACSOTAY,

  • LUIS I. QUIROZ


Luis A. Buatois [luis.buatois@usask.ca], Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, 114 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2, Canada; Oliver Macsotay [macsotayo@gmail.com], Urbanización El Trigal Norte, Av. Atlántico no. 155-61 B, Valencia, 2001,Venezuela; Luis I. Quiroz [luq935@mail.usask.ca], Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, 114 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2, Canada, and Center for Tropical Paleoecology and Archaeology, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Box 0843-03092 and # 8232, Balboa, Republic of Panamá

Abstract

The sinusoidal decapod crustacean burrow Sinusichnus sinuosus is documented from the Upper Cretaceous Hidden Lake Formation of James Ross Island (Antarctica), the Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene Naricual Formation of the Eastern Venezuela Basin, and the Middle Miocene Socorro Formation of the Falcón Basin of Western Venezuela, significantly expanding its geographical and palaeolatitudinal range. These burrows may have served for bacterial farming in relatively stressful settings characterized by deltaic progradation. Sinusichnus sinuosus seems to display a broad latitudinal range, from low latitude tropical settings (Venezuela) to intermediate latitude temperate areas (Spain and France), and high latitude cold waters (Antarctica). The appearance of S. sinuosus in the Cretaceous reveals the acquisition of more sophisticated feeding strategies by decapod crustaceans, reflecting the dominance of the Modern Evolutionary Fauna.

Ancillary