Variation in OPRM1 and Risk of Suicidal Behavior in Drug-Dependent Individuals

Authors

  • Albert J. Arias MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut
    2. VA CT Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut
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  • Grace Chan PhD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut
    2. VA CT Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut
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  • Joel Gelernter MD,

    1. VA CT Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut
    2. Departments of Psychiatry; Genetics; and Neurobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
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  • Lindsay Farrer PhD,

    1. Departments of Medicine; Neurology; Genetics and Genomics; Epidemiology; and Biostatistics, Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Henry R. Kranzler MD

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut
    2. VA CT Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut
    3. Department of Genetics and Developmental Biology, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut
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Dr. Arias is currently in the Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut and VA CT Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut. Dr. Kranzler is currently in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and VISN4 MIRECC, Philadelphia VAMC, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Address correspondence to Dr. Kranzler, Treatment Research Center, University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104. E-mail: kranzler_h@mail.trc.upenn.edu.

Abstract

Completed suicide and nonfatal suicide-related outcomes (SROs), such as suicidal ideation and attempts, are heritable. A recent genetic association study in a sample of suicide victims reported a protective effect of the G allele of Asn40Asp (rs1799971) on risk for completed suicide. We examined the association of three OPRM1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs1799971, rs609148, and rs648893) with SRO in 426 European Americans, using GEE logistic regression analysis to examine the association of a lifetime history of SRO. There was no allelic association with the SRO phenotypes. A larger sample may be needed to identify risk variants that convey SRO risk. OPRM1 may not be important in the risk of SRO. (Am J Addict 2011;21:5–10)

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