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The Short Inventory of Problems—Modified for Drug Use (SIP-DU): Validity in a Primary Care Sample

Authors

  • Donald Allensworth-Davies PhD, MSc,

    1. Data Coordinating Center, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Debbie M. Cheng ScD,

    1. Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
    2. Department of Medicine, Clinical Addiction Research and Education (CARE) Unit, Section of General Internal Medicine, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Peter C. Smith MD, MSc,

    1. Department of Medicine, Section of General Internal Medicine, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Jeffrey H. Samet MD, MA, MPH,

    1. Department of Medicine, Clinical Addiction Research and Education (CARE) Unit, Section of General Internal Medicine, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
    2. Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Richard Saitz MD, MPH

    1. Department of Medicine, Clinical Addiction Research and Education (CARE) Unit, Section of General Internal Medicine, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
    2. Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
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Address correspondence to Dr. Allensworth-Davies, Data Coordinating Center, Boston University School of Public Health, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, Third Floor, Boston, MA 02118. E-mail: ddavies7@bu.edu.

Abstract

Primary care physicians can help drug-dependent patients mitigate adverse drug use consequences; instruments validated in primary care to measure these consequences would aid in this effort. This study evaluated the validity of the Short Inventory of Problems—Alcohol and Drugs modified for Drug Use (SIP-DU) among subjects recruited from a primary care clinic (n= 106). SIP-DU internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach's alphas, convergent validity by correlating the total SIP-DU score with the DAST-10, and construct validity by analyzing the factor structure. The SIP-DU demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha for overall scale .95, subscales .72–.90) comparable with other SIP versions and correlated well with the DAST-10 (r= .70). Confirmatory factor analysis suggested an unacceptable fit of previously proposed factors; exploratory factor analyses suggested a single factor of drug use consequences. The SIP-DU offers primary care clinicians a valid and practical assessment tool for drug use consequences. (Am J Addict 2012;21:257–262)

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