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In vitro fertilization outcomes and alcohol consumption in at-risk drinkers: The effects of a randomized intervention

Authors

  • Brooke V. Rossi MD,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Grace Chang MD, MPH,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Katharine F. Berry MA,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Mark D. Hornstein MD,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Stacey A. Missmer ScD

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
    2. Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
    3. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Presented in part at the 66th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Denver, Colorado, October 23–27, 2010.

Address correspondence to Dr. Rossi, University Hospitals Fertility Center, 1000 Auburn Dr., Suite 310, Beachwood, OH 44122. E-mail: brooke.rossi@uhhospitals.org.

Abstract

Background and Objectives

Women's use of alcohol in pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of fetal loss and birth defects. Also, alcohol use in women decreases the success of infertility treatment, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF). Our goal was to determine if there were differences in IVF outcomes and alcohol use parameters among at-risk drinkers randomized to a brief intervention (BI) versus assessment only (AO).

Methods

We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine the effect of BI or AO among at-risk drinkers on IVF. We studied 37 women (AO = 21; BI = 16).

Results

While the BI group had a significantly greater decrease in the number of drinks/drinking day compared to the AO group (p = .04), there were no differences in the likelihood of implantation failure, chemical pregnancy, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, or live birth.

Conclusions

BI and AO contributed to a decrease in alcohol use and did not demonstrate differences in IVF outcomes. A larger study may confirm these preliminary findings.

Scientific Significance

Our results will assist care providers in treating alcohol use in pregnancy in an effective way, such that IVF cycles and the chance of pregnancy are optimized. (Am J Addict 2013;22:481–485)

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