Quit intention as a predictor of quit attempts over time in adolescents with psychiatric disorders

Authors

  • Golfo K. Tzilos PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Providence, Rhode Island
    2. Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
    • Address correspondence to Dr. Tzilos, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University, Box G-S121-4, Providence, RI 02912. E-mail: Golfo_Tzilos@brown.edu.

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  • David R. Strong PhD,

    1. Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
    2. Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, California
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  • Ana M. Abrantes PhD,

    1. Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
    2. Butler Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island
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  • Susan E. Ramsey PhD,

    1. Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
    2. Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island
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  • Richard A. Brown PhD

    1. Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
    2. Butler Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island
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Abstract

Background

Rates of smoking among adolescents with psychiatric comorbidity are high, despite the well-known health risks. The current longitudinal study examined patterns of quitting behavior in adolescent smokers with psychiatric comorbidity.

Methods

The study evaluated 191 inpatient adolescents who had been enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of motivational interviewing versus brief advice for smoking cessation, and assessed their intentions to quit smoking.

Results

Rates of quit attempts at post-hospital, 1-month, and 6-month assessments were 23%, 17%, and 17%, respectively. Adolescents who reported an intention to quit smoking (43%) were significantly more likely to report a quit attempt, regardless of psychiatric symptoms, cognitive factors, or substance use.

Conclusions

Intention to quit smoking appears to translate to substantial quit behavior, even in a high-risk adolescent population that may otherwise be viewed as uninterested in quitting, suggesting the need to proactively connect this population with adequate services and follow-up support. (Am J Addict 2014;23:84–89)

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