Authorship and the Use of Biological Information in Endangered Species Recovery Plans

Authors

  • Leah R. Gerber,

    Corresponding author
    1. National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California, Santa Barbara, 735 State Street,
      Suite 300, Santa Barbara, CA 93101–3351, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Cheryl B. Schultz

    1. National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California, Santa Barbara, 735 State Street,
      Suite 300, Santa Barbara, CA 93101–3351, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author

* email gerber@nceas.ucsb.edu

Abstract

Abstract: We examined the relationship between authorship and the use of biological information in recovery plans under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Approximately one-third of recovery plans were written solely by federal government employees, and one-third of plans included authors with university affiliations. The number of plans written strictly by federal staff increased significantly over time, whereas the percentage of plans that included authors with university affiliation remained unchanged. We tested three hypotheses posed by Clark et al. (1994) regarding authorship and endangered species recovery and found that (1) groups of authors from diverse affiliations are likely to strengthen the recovery planning process, (2) recovery plans lacking nonfederal participation suffer from inadequate attention to species biology, and (3) academic affiliation is strongly associated with the use of focal-species biology in recovery plans. Our results suggest that modifying the choice of participants in the recovery planning process may increase the use of biological information in recovery measures recommended in recovery plans and thus influence the eventual success of recovery efforts.

Abstract

Resumen: Examinamos las relaciones entre la autoría de los planes de recuperación y el uso de información biológica en los planes de Recuperación del Acta de Especies en Peligro de EE.UU. Aproximadamente un tercio de los planes de recuperación fueron escritos únicamente por empleados federales y un tercio de los planes incluyeron autores con afiliación a universidades. El número de planes escritos estrictamente por personal federal se incrementó significativamente con el tiempo, mientras que el porcentaje de planes que incluían autores con afiliación universitaria permanecieron sin cambio. Evaluamos tres hipótesis planteadas por Clark et al. (1994) relacionadas con la autoría y la recuperación de especies en peligro y encontramos que: 1) los grupos de autores con diversas afiliaciones son más viables de robustecen el proceso de planeación de la recuperación, 2) los planes de recuperación que carecían de la participación no-federal sufrían de una inadecuada atención de la biología de las especies, y 3) la afiliación académica está fuertemente asociada con el uso de la biología de las especies en los planes de recuperación. Nuestros resultados sugieren que la modificación de los participantes en el proceso de planeación de recuperaciones puede incrementar el uso de información biológica en medidas de recuperación recomendadas en los planes de recuperación y con ello, influenciar el éxito eventual de los esfuerzos de recuperación.

Ancillary