Get access

Long-Term Population Changes of Native and Introduced Birds in the Alaka‘i Swamp, Kaua‘i

Authors

  • JEFFREY T. FOSTER,

    Corresponding author
    1. U.S. Geological Survey–Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center, Kilauea Field Station, P. O. Box 44, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • ERIK J. TWEED,

    1. U.S. Geological Survey–Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center, Kilauea Field Station, P. O. Box 44, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • RICHARD J. CAMP,

    1. U.S. Geological Survey–Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center, Kilauea Field Station, P. O. Box 44, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • BETHANY L. WOODWORTH,

    1. U.S. Geological Survey–Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center, Kilauea Field Station, P. O. Box 44, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • COREY D. ADLER,

    1. U.S. Geological Survey–Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center, Kilauea Field Station, P. O. Box 44, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • TOM TELFER

    1. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Forestry and Wildlife, 3060 Eiwa Street, Lihue, HI 96766, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author

email jtfoster@uiuc.edu

Abstract

Abstract: Within the last 30 years, five endemic bird species of the Alaka‘i Swamp, Kaua‘i, Hawai‘i, have likely gone extinct. We documented population trends of the remaining avifauna in this time period to identify a common pattern in the Hawaiian Islands: decline of native species and expansion of introduced species. We conducted bird surveys over 100 km2 of the Alaka‘i and Kōke‘e regions of Kaua‘i in March–April 2000 to estimate population size, distribution, and range limits of seven native and six introduced forest birds. We compared the results with four previous surveys conducted over the last 30 years. Five of the seven native species we studied have fared well, maintaining sizeable populations (>20,000 individuals) and unchanged or increasing numbers. The endemic ‘Akikiki (Oreomystis bairdi), however, declined from 6296 (SE ± 1374) to 1472 (SE ± 680) individuals and exhibited range contraction from 88 to 36 km2. The ‘I‘iwi (Vestiaria coccinea) also experienced a decline and contraction, though not as severe. Populations of several introduced forest birds are increasing, but all species, excluding the Japanese White-eye (Zosterops japonicus), were at low numbers (<5,500 individuals in survey area). One introduced species, the Japanese Bush-Warbler (Cettia diphone) recently invaded, whereas another, the Red-billed Leiothrix (Leiothrix lutea), has been extirpated. Two hurricanes in the past 20 years appear to have most strongly affected nectarivores and may have contributed to the decline or extinction of several other species. Overall, native bird populations on Kaua‘i have exhibited species-specific responses to limiting factors. Although most native populations appear stable, the extant native avifauna is vulnerable as a result of limited distributions and the potential for widespread habitat degradation.

Abstract

Resumen: Es probable que se hayan extinguido cinco especies endémicas del Pantano Alaka‘i, Kaua‘i en los últimos 30 años. Documentamos las tendencias poblacionales de la avifauna remanente en este período para evaluar un patrón común en las Islas Hawaianas: declinación de especies nativas y expansión de especies introducidas. Realizamos muestreos de aves en las regiones Alaka‘i y Kōke‘e de Kaua‘i en marzo-abril 2000 para estimar el tamaño, la distribución y los límites poblacionales de siete especies nativas y seis especies introducidas de aves de bosque. Comparamos los resultados con datos de cuatro muestreos previos llevados a cabo en los últimos 30 años. Cinco de las siete especies nativas estudiadas han estado bien, manteniendo poblaciones de >20,000 individuos y números sin cambio o en incremento. Sin embargo, el ‘Akikiki (Oreomystis bairdi) endémico declinó de 6,296 (ES ± 1,374) a 1,472 (ES ± 680) individuos y exhibió una contracción en su rango de 88 a 36 km2. El‘ I‘iwi (Vestiaria coccinea) también sufrió una declinación y contracción, aunque no tan severa. Las poblaciones de varias especies de aves de bosque introducidas están incrementando, pero todas las especies, excluyendo Zosterops japonicus, tuvieron números bajos (<5,500 individuos en el área muestreada). Una especie introducida, Cettia diphone, invadió recientemente, mientras que otra, Leiothrix lutea, ha sido extirpada. Parece que dos huracanes en los últimos 20 años han afectado severamente a las nectarívoras y pueden haber contribuido a la declinación o extinción de varias otras especies. En general, las poblaciones nativas en Kaua‘i han exhibido respuestas especie-específicas a los factores limitantes. Aunque la mayoría de las poblaciones nativas parecen estables, la avifauna nativa existente es vulnerable debido a distribuciones limitadas y a la degradación generalizada potencial del hábitat.

Ancillary