Get access

Forest Fragmentation Increases Nest Predation in the Eurasian Treecreeper

Authors

  • ESA HUHTA,

    Corresponding author
    1. Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku, Finland
      § Current address: Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kolari Research Station, Muoniontie 21A, FIN-95900 Kolari, Finland, email esa.huhta@metla.fi
    Search for more papers by this author
  • TEIJA AHO,

    1. Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences and Konnevesi Research Station, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40351 Jyväskylä, Finland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • ARI JÄNTTI,

    1. Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences and Konnevesi Research Station, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40351 Jyväskylä, Finland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • PETRI SUORSA,

    1. Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku, Finland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • MARKKU KUITUNEN,

    1. Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences and Konnevesi Research Station, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40351 Jyväskylä, Finland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • ARI NIKULA,

    1. Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Station, P.O. Box 16, FIN-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • HARRI HAKKARAINEN

    1. Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku, Finland
    Search for more papers by this author

§ Current address: Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kolari Research Station, Muoniontie 21A, FIN-95900 Kolari, Finland, email esa.huhta@metla.fi

Abstract

Abstract: We used long-term breeding data to monitor the influences of fragmentation and habitat composition at different spatial scales on the reproductive success of Eurasian Treecreepers (Certhia familiaris) breeding in nest boxes. We collected data from the same forest patches (2.7–65.1 ha in size) during seven breeding seasons. Nest predation varied considerably over the years and was the primary cause of nesting failure (mean annual rate of 21.6 ± 12.8%). Nest predation explained most of the variation in fledgling production during the study period. Landscape-level fragmentation (radius of 500 m from territory center) affected nest predation more than did fragmentation on the territory scale (radius of 200 m from territory center). In general, nest loss due to predation in fragmented landscapes (32.4%) was almost threefold that of less fragmented (12.0%) landscapes. Of the habitat variables, predation rate correlated positively with the density of edges between forest and open land and with the proportion of sapling stands on the spatial scale of 500 m around a nest. In the core area of a territory (radius of 30 m from territory center), a high density of trees increased the frequency of nest predation. Further, a high proportion of agricultural land close to a nest site increased nest losses of treecreepers, probably because of a high degree of mustelid predation. Our results showed that the spatial scale on which we examined nest predation is important and that even within moderately fragmented landscapes it is possible to detect fragmentation-related nest predation.

Abstract

Resumen: Utilizamos datos de largo plazo para hacer un seguimiento de los efectos de la fragmentación y composición del hábitat en diferentes escalas espaciales sobre el éxito reproductivo de Certhia familiaris en nidos de cajón. Colectamos datos de los mismos parches de bosque (2.7–65.1 ha) durante siete épocas reproductivas. La depredación de nidos varió considerablemente a lo largo de los años y fue la causa principal del fracaso reproductivo (tasa media anual de 21.6 ± 12.8%). la depredación de nidos explicó la mayor variación en la producción de crías durante el período de estudio. La fragmentación a nivel de paisaje (radio de 500 m del centro del territorio) afectó a la depredación de nidos más que la fragmentación a escala de territorio (radio de 200 m del centro del territorio). En general, la pérdida de nidos debido a la depredación en paisajes fragmentados (32.4%) fue casi tres veces mayor que en los paisajes menos fragmentados (12%). De las variables de hábitat, la tasa de depredación se correlacionó positivamente con la densidad de los bordes entre el bosque y terrenos abiertos y con la proporción de árboles jóvenes en la escala espacial de 500 m alrededor de un nido. En el área núcleo de un territorio (radio de 30 m del centro del territorio), una alta densidad de árboles incrementó la frecuencia de depredación de nidos. Más aun, una alta proporción de terreno agrícola cercano a un nido incrementó las pérdidas de nidos, probablemente debido a un alto grado de depredación por mustélidos. Nuestros resultados mostraron que la escala espacial a la que examinamos la depredación de nidos es importante y que aun en paisajes moderadamente fragmentados es posible detectar la depredación de nidos relacionada con la fragmentación.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary