Effect of Invasive Plant Species on Temperate Wetland Plant Diversity

Authors

  • JEFF E. HOULAHAN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, University of Ottawa, 30 Marie Curie, P.O. Box 450, Station A, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • C. SCOTT FINDLAY

    1. Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, University of Ottawa, 30 Marie Curie, P.O. Box 450, Station A, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5, Canada
    2. Institute of Environment, University of Ottawa, 555 King Edward Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author

‡Current address: Department of Biology, University of New Brunswick at Saint John, P.O. Box 5050, Saint John, New Brunswick E2L 4L5 Canada, email jeffhoul@science.uottawa.ca

Abstract

Abstract: Invasive species are a major threat to global biodiversity and an important cause of biotic homogenization of ecosystems. Exotic plants have been identified as a particular concern because of the widely held belief that they competitively exclude native plant species. We examined the correlation between native and invasive species richness in 58 Ontario inland wetlands. The relationship between exotic and native species richness was positive even when we controlled for important covarying factors. In addition, we examined the relationship between the abundance of four native species ( Typha latifolia, T. angustifolia, Salix petiolaris, Nuphar variegatum) and four invasive species ( Lythrum salicaria, Hydrocharis morsus-ranae, Phalaris arundinacea, Rhamnus frangula) that often dominate temperate wetlands and native and rare native species richness. Exotic species were no more likely to dominate a wetland than native species, and the proportion of dominant exotic species that had a significant negative effect on the native plant community was the same as the proportion of native species with a significant negative effect. We conclude that the key to conservation of inland wetland biodiversity is to discourage the spread of community dominants, regardless of geographical origin.

Abstract

Resumen: Las especies invasoras son una amenaza mayor para la biodiversidad global y una causa importante de la homogenización biótica de ecosistemas. Las plantas exóticas son de particular preocupación por la amplia creencia de que excluyen competitivamente a especies de plantas nativas. Examinamos la correlación entre la riqueza de especies nativas e invasoras en 58 humedales interiores en Ontario. La relación entre riqueza de especies exóticas y nativas fue positiva aún cuando controlamos importantes factores covariantes. Adicionalmente, examinamos la relación entre la abundancia de cuatro especies nativas (Typha latifolia, T. angustifolia, Salix petiolaris, Nuphar variegatum) y cuatro exóticas (Lythrum salicaria, Hydrocharis morsus-ranae, Phalaris arundinacea, and Rhamnus frangula) que a menudo son dominantes en humedales templados y la riqueza de especies nativas y nativas raras. Las especies exóticas no tuvieron mayor probabilidad de dominar un humedal que las especies nativas y la proporción de especies exóticas dominantes que tuvieron efecto negativo significativo sobre la comunidad de plantas nativas fue la misma que la proporción de especies nativas con efecto negativo significativo. Concluimos que la clave para la conservación de la biodiversidad de humedales interiores es evitar la dispersión de dominantes en la comunidad, independientemente de su origen geográfico.

Ancillary