Modeling Prescribed Surface-Fire Regimes for Pinus strobus Conservation

Authors

  • JENNIFER L. BEVERLY,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Forestry, University of Toronto, Earth Sciences Centre, 33 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3B3 Canada
    • Current address: Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Northern Forestry Centre, 5320–122 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, T6H 3S5 Canada, email jbeverly@nrcan.gc.ca

    Search for more papers by this author
  • DAVID L. MARTELL

    1. Faculty of Forestry, University of Toronto, Earth Sciences Centre, 33 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3B3 Canada
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Abstract:  We developed a simple model of  Pinus strobus L. stand dynamics to compare the impacts of different temporal arrangements of surface fires designed to reflect the application of fire as both an essential ecosystem process (natural fire) and as an efficient means of producing specific habitat features or other values (optimal fire). We used a stochastic simulation model of fire processes to estimate the mean fire-return interval that would maximize stand structural diversity. We investigated trade-offs between structural diversity and temporal population stability associated with changes in the fire interval and used a deterministic version of the model to explore the effects of scheduling fires at fixed intervals. In stochastic simulations, maximum structural diversity occurred at intermediate levels of disturbance (40-year mean fire interval). When fires were scheduled at fixed intervals, a longer, 100-year return interval maximized diversity. Mean fire-return interval was a mitigating factor in the diversity-stability relationship, which changed from positive to negative as the fire interval was reduced progressively from 250 to 5 years. As an alternative to scheduling fires at specified mean intervals, we developed a goal-programming model (a form of linear programming model) and used it to identify an optimal fire schedule for achieving habitat and visual-quality objectives. In comparison with the 40-year stochastic mean fire interval, which maximized structural diversity, the optimal schedule produced comparable levels of both diversity and fire frequency. Our results show how simulation and goal-programming models can be used to evaluate prescribed fire-scheduling alternatives and to explore the comparative advantages of natural and optimal fire-management approaches.

Abstract

Resumen:  Desarrollamos un modelo simple de la dinámica de Pinus strobus para comparar los impactos de diferentes arreglos de fuegos superficiales diseñados para reflejar las aplicaciones de fuego tanto como un proceso esencial del ecosistema (incendio natural) y como un medio eficiente para producir características específicas u otros valores en el hábitat (incendio óptimo). Utilizamos un modelo de simulación estocástico de los procesos de fuego para estimar el intervalo medio de retorno de fuego que maximizaría la diversidad estructural. Investigamos el balance entre la diversidad estructural y la estabilidad temporal de la población asociadas con los cambios en intervalos de fuego y usamos una versión determinística del modelo para explorar los efectos de programar los incendios a intervalos determinados. En las simulaciones estocásticas, la máxima diversidad estructural ocurrió en niveles intermedios de perturbación (40 años de intervalo de fuego promedio). Cuando los incendios se programaron en intervalos fijos, un intervalo de retorno más largo, 100 años, maximizó la diversidad. El intervalo de retorno promedio fue un factor mitigante en la relación diversidad-estabilidad, que cambió de positiva a negativa a medida que se redujo progresivamente el intervalo de fuego de 250 a años. Como una alternativa a la programación de incendios en intervalos promedio especificados, desarrollamos un modelo de programación de metas (una forma de modelos de programación lineal) y lo utilizamos para identificar un cronograma de incendios para alcanzar objetivos de calidad de hábitat y visual. En comparación con el intervalo promedio de fuego estocástico de 40 años, que maximizó la diversidad estructural, el cronograma óptimo produjo niveles comparables tanto de diversidad como de frecuencia de fuego. Nuestros resultados muestran como pueden ser utilizados los modelos de simulación y de programación de metas para evaluar alternativas de fuego prescrito y para explorar las ventajas comparativas de los métodos de gestión de incendios naturales y óptimos.

Ancillary