Get access

Experimental Assessment of Coral Reef Rehabilitation Following Blast Fishing

Authors

  • HELEN E. FOX,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Integrative Biology, 3060 VLSB, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3140, U.S.A.
      ‡ Current address: Conservation Science Program, World Wildlife Fund, 1250 24th Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20037, U.S.A., email helen.fox@wwfus.org
    Search for more papers by this author
  • PETER J. MOUS,

    1. The Nature Conservancy Coastal and Marine Indonesia Program, Jln. Pengembak No. 2, Sanur, Bali, Indonesia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • JOS S. PET,

    1. The Nature Conservancy Coastal and Marine Indonesia Program, Jln. Pengembak No. 2, Sanur, Bali, Indonesia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • ANDREAS H. MULJADI,

    1. The Nature Conservancy Coastal and Marine Indonesia Program, Jln. Pengembak No. 2, Sanur, Bali, Indonesia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • ROY L. CALDWELL

    1. Department of Integrative Biology, 3060 VLSB, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3140, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author

‡ Current address: Conservation Science Program, World Wildlife Fund, 1250 24th Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20037, U.S.A., email helen.fox@wwfus.org

Abstract

Abstract: Illegal fishing with explosives has damaged coral reefs throughout Southeast Asia. In addition to killing fish and other organisms, the blasts shatter coral skeletons, leaving fields of broken rubble that shift in the current, abrading or burying new coral recruits, and thereby slowing or preventing reef recovery. Successful restoration and rehabilitation efforts can contribute to coral reef conservation. We used field experiments to assess the effectiveness of different low-cost methods for coral reef rehabilitation in Komodo National Park (KNP), Indonesia. Our experiments were conducted at three different spatial scales. At a scale of 1 × 1 m plots, we tested three different rehabilitation methods: rock piles, cement slabs, and netting pinned to the rubble. Significantly more corals per square meter grew on rocks, followed by cement, netting, and untreated rubble, although many plots were scattered by strong water current or buried by rubble after 2.5 years. To test the benefits of the most successful treatment, rocks, at more realistic scales, we established 10 × 10 m plots of rock piles at each of our nine sites in 2000. Three years after installation, coverage by hard corals on the rocks continued to increase, although rehabilitation in high current areas remained the most difficult. In 2002 rehabilitation efforts in KNP were increased over 6000 m2 to test four rock pile designs at each of four rubble field sites. Assuming that there is an adequate larval supply, using rocks for simple, low-budget, large-scale rehabilitation appears to be a viable option for restoring the structural foundation of damaged reefs.

Abstract

Resumen: La pesca ilegal con explosivos ha dañado a arrecifes de coral en el sureste de Asia. Además de matar a peces y otros organismos, las explosiones destruyen esqueletos de corales, dejando campos de escombros rotos que se mueven con la corriente, erosionando o enterrando a reclutas de coral nuevos y por lo tanto disminuyen o previenen la recuperación del coral. Esfuerzos exitosos de restauración y rehabilitación pueden contribuir a la conservación de arrecifes de coral. Usamos experimentos de campo para evaluar la efectividad de diferentes métodos de bajo costo para la rehabilitación de arrecifes de coral en el Parque Nacional Komodo (PNK), Indonesia. Desarrollamos nuestros experimentos en tres escalas espaciales diferentes. A una escala de parcelas de 1 x 1 m, probamos tres métodos de rehabilitación: pilas de rocas, losas de cemento y redes sobre el escombro. Crecieron significativamente más corales por metro cuadrado sobre rocas, seguido por el cemento, redes y escombro sin tratamiento, aunque muchas parcelas fueron dispersadas por la fuerte corriente de agua o enterradas por escombros después de 2.5 años. Para probar los beneficios del tratamiento más exitoso, rocas, a escalas más realistas, en 2000 establecimos parcelas de 10 x10 m con pilas de rocas en cada unos de nuestros nueve sitios. Tres años después, la cobertura de corales duros sobre las rocas continuó incrementando, aunque la rehabilitación en áreas con corrientes fuertes fue la más difícil. En 2002, los esfuerzos de rehabilitación en PNK se incrementaron a 6000 m2 para probar cuatro diseños de pilas de rocas en cada uno de los cuatro sitios con escombros. Asumiendo que hay una adecuada existencia de larvas, la utilización de rocas para rehabilitación simple, de bajo costo y gran escala parece ser una opción viable para la restauración de la base estructural de arrecifes dañados.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary