An Operational Model for Implementing Conservation Action

Authors

  • ANDREW T. KNIGHT,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Botany and Terrestrial Ecology Research Unit, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031, South Africa
    • ‡ Current address: Department of Environmental Science, Rhodes University, Grahamstown 6140, South Africa, email tawnyfrogmouth@gmail.com tawnyfrogmouth@gmail.com

    Search for more papers by this author
  • RICHARD M. COWLING,

    1. Department of Botany and Terrestrial Ecology Research Unit, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • BRUCE M. CAMPBELL

    1. Research School of Environmental Studies, Charles Darwin University, Darwin 0909, Northern Territory, Australia, and Centre for International Forestry Research, Bogor, Indonesia
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Abstract:  The preoccupation of many conservation planners with the refinement of systematic assessment techniques has manifested an “implementation crisis” in conservation planning. This preoccupation has provided systematic assessments with well-tested tools (e.g., area selection algorithms) and principles (e.g., representation, complementarity), but our understanding of these techniques currently far exceeds our ability to apply them effectively to pragmatic conservation problems. The science is informative about where one needs to do conservation, but silent on how to achieve it. Operational models, defined as simplified conceptualizations of processes for implementing conservation action at priority conservation areas, are essential for guiding conservation planning initiatives because they assist understanding of how these processes function. Operational models developed to date have largely been linear, simplistic, and focused on the systematic assessment of biological entities. Experience in the real world indicates that operational models for conducting conservation planning initiatives should explicitly complement a systematic conservation assessment with activities that empower individuals and institutions (enabling) and explicitly aim to secure conservation action (implementation). Specifically, implementing effective conservation action requires that systematic assessments be integrated functionally with a process for developing an implementation strategy and processes for stakeholder collaboration while maintaining a broad focus on the implementation of conservation action. A suite of hallmarks define effective operational models (e.g., stakeholder collaboration, links with land-use planning, social learning, and action research). Greater development and testing of the practical application of operational models should lead to higher levels of effective implementation and alleviate the implementation crisis. Social learning institutions are essential for ensuring ongoing improvement in the development and application of operational models that deliver effective conservation action.

Abstract

Resumen:  Con el refinamiento de las técnicas de evaluación, la preocupación de muchos planificadores de conservación ha manifestado una “crisis de implementación” en la planificación de conservación. Esta preocupación ha proporcionado evaluaciones sistemáticas con herramientas (e. g., algoritmos para la selección de área) y principios (e. g., representación, complementariedad) bien probados, pero nuestro entendimiento de estas técnicas actualmente excede en mucho a nuestra habilidad para aplicarlas efectivamente en problemas pragmáticos de conservación. La ciencia es informativa respecto a donde se requiere conservar, pero no dice como hacerlo. Los modelos operacionales, definidos como conceptualizaciones simplificadas de los procesos para la implementación de acciones de conservación en áreas prioritarias para la conservación, son esenciales para guiar iniciativas de planificación de conservación porque ayudan al entendimiento de cómo funcionan estos procesos. Los modelos operacionales desarrollados a la fecha han sido lineales, simplistas y enfocan la evaluación sistemática de entidades biológicas. La experiencia en el mundo real indica que los modelos operacionales para conducir a las iniciativas de planificación de conservación deberían complementar explícitamente a una evaluación de conservación con actividades que faculten a individuos e instituciones (habilitación) y enfocarse explícitamente en asegurar acciones de conservación (implementación). Específicamente, la implementación de acciones efectivas de conservación requiere que las evaluaciones sistemáticas se integren funcionalmente con un proceso para el desarrollo de una estrategia de implementación y con procesos para la colaboración de interesados y al mismo tiempo mantengan un enfoque general en la implementación de acciones de conservación. Un conjunto de sellos define a los modelos operacionales efectivos (e. g., colaboración de interesados, vínculos con la planificación de uso de suelo, aprendizaje social e investigación). El mayor desarrollo y pruebas de la aplicación práctica de los modelos operacionales deberán llevar a niveles más altos de implementación efectiva y aliviar la crisis de implementación. Las instituciones de aprendizaje social son esenciales para asegurar la mejora continua en el desarrollo y aplicación de modelos operacionales que entregan acciones efectivas de conservación.

Ancillary