Get access

Effects of the Interaction between Genetic Diversity and UV-B Radiation on Wood Frog Fitness

Authors

  • SHAUNA L. WEYRAUCH,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Evolution, Ecology & Organismal Biology, The Ohio State University, 300 Aronoff Laboratory, 318 W. 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • THOMAS C. GRUBB JR

    1. Department of Evolution, Ecology & Organismal Biology, The Ohio State University, 300 Aronoff Laboratory, 318 W. 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author

* Current address: The Ohio State University—Newark Campus, 1179 University Drive, Newark, OH 43055, U.S.A., email weyrauch.2@osu.edu

Abstract

Abstract: Genetic diversity may buffer amphibian populations against environmental vicissitudes. We hypothesized that wood frogs ( Rana sylvatica) from populations with lower genetic diversity are more susceptible to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation than those from populations with higher diversity. We used RAPD markers to obtain genetic diversity estimates for 12 wood frog populations. We reared larval wood frogs from these populations and exposed experimental groups of eggs and larvae to one of three treatments: unfiltered sunlight, sunlight filtered through a UV-B-blocking filter (Mylar), and sunlight filtered through a UV-B-transmitting filter (acetate). In groups exposed to UV-B, larval mortality and deformity rates increased significantly, but egg mortality did not. We found a significant negative relationship between genetic diversity and egg mortality, larval mortality, and deformity rates. Furthermore, the interaction between UV-B treatment and genetic diversity significantly affected larval mortality. Populations with low genetic diversity experienced higher larval mortality rates when exposed to UV-B than did populations with high genetic diversity. This is the first time an interaction between genetic diversity and an environmental stressor has been documented in amphibians. Differences in genetic diversity among populations, coupled with environmental stressors, may help explain patterns of amphibian decline.

Abstract

Resumen: La diversidad genética puede defender a las poblaciones de anfibios de las vicisitudes ambientales. Probamos la hipótesis de que ranas ( Rana sylvatica) de poblaciones con menor diversidad genética son más susceptibles a la radiación ultravioleta-B (UV-B) que las poblaciones con mayor diversidad genética. Utilizamos marcadores RAPD para obtener estimaciones de la diversidad genética de 12 poblaciones de Rana sylvatica. Criamos larvas de ranas de estas poblaciones y expusimos a grupos experimentales de huevos y larvas a uno de tres tratamientos: luz solar no filtrada, luz solar filtrada con un filtro bloqueador de UV-B (Mylar), y luz solar filtrada con un filtro transmisor de UV-B (acetato). En los grupos expuestos a UV-B, la mortalidad de larvas y tasas de deformidad incrementaron significativamente, pero la mortalidad de huevos no. Encontramos una relación negativa significativa entre la diversidad genética y la mortalidad de huevos, mortalidad de larvas y tasas de deformidad. Más aun, la interacción entre tratamiento de UV-B y diversidad genética afectó significativamente a la mortalidad de larvas. Las poblaciones con baja diversidad genética experimentaron mayor mortalidad de larvas cuando fueron expuestas a UV-B que las poblaciones con mayor diversidad genética. Esta es la primera vez que en anfibios se ha documentado una interacción entre la diversidad genética y un factor ambiental estresante. Las diferencias genéticas entre poblaciones, combinadas con factores ambientales estresantes, pueden ayudar a entender los patrones de declinación de anfibios.

Ancillary