Get access

Transferability of Species Distribution Models: a Functional Habitat Approach for Two Regionally Threatened Butterflies

Authors

  • WOUTER VANREUSEL,

    Corresponding author
    1. Biodiversity Research Centre, Catholic University of Louvain (UCL), Ecology & Biogeography Unit, Croix du Sud 4, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
    2. Laboratory of Animal Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author
  • DIRK MAES,

    1. Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Kliniekstraat 25, B-1070 Brussels, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author
  • HANS VAN DYCK

    1. Biodiversity Research Centre, Catholic University of Louvain (UCL), Ecology & Biogeography Unit, Croix du Sud 4, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author

§ email vandyck@ecol.ucl.ac.be

Abstract

Abstract: Numerous models for predicting species distribution have been developed for conservation purposes. Most of them make use of environmental data (e.g., climate, topography, land use) at a coarse grid resolution (often kilometres). Such approaches are useful for conservation policy issues including reserve-network selection. The efficiency of predictive models for species distribution is usually tested on the area for which they were developed. Although highly interesting from the point of view of conservation efficiency, transferability of such models to independent areas is still under debate. We tested the transferability of habitat-based predictive distribution models for two regionally threatened butterflies, the green hairstreak (Callophrys rubi) and the grayling (Hipparchia semele), within and among three nature reserves in northeastern Belgium. We built predictive models based on spatially detailed maps of area-wide distribution and density of ecological resources. We used resources directly related to ecological functions (host plants, nectar sources, shelter, microclimate) rather than environmental surrogate variables. We obtained models that performed well with few resource variables. All models were transferable—although to different degrees—among the independent areas within the same broad geographical region. We argue that habitat models based on essential functional resources could transfer better in space than models that use indirect environmental variables. Because functional variables can easily be interpreted and even be directly affected by terrain managers, these models can be useful tools to guide species-adapted reserve management.

Abstract

Resumen: Se han desarrollado numerosos modelos para predecir la distribución de especies con fines de conservación. La mayoría de ellos hacen uso de datos ambientales (e.g., clima, topografía, uso de suelo) a una resolución gruesa (a menudo kilómetros). Tales enfoques son útiles para el tema de políticas de conservación incluyendo la selección de redes de reservas. La eficiencia de los modelos predictivos de la distribución de especies generalmente es probada en la zona para la que fueron desarrollados. Aunque muy interesante desde el punto de vista de la eficiencia de la conservación, la transferibilidad de dichos modelos a áreas independientes aun esta en debate. Probamos la transferibilidad de modelos predictivos de distribución basados en el hábitat para dos mariposas regionalmente amenazadas, Callophrys rubi e Hipparchia semele dentro y entre tres reservas naturales en el noreste de Bélgica. Construimos modelos predictivos con base en mapas espacialmente detallados de la distribución y densidad de los recursos ecológicos. Utilizamos recursos directamente relacionados con las funciones ecológicas (plantas hospederas, fuentes de néctar, refugios y microclima) en lugar de variables ambientales sustitutas. Obtuvimos modelos que funcionaron bien con pocas variables de recursos. Todos los modelos fueron transferibles—aunque en diferentes grados—entre las áreas independientes dentro de la misma región geográfica general. Argumentamos que los modelos de hábitat basados en recursos funcionales esenciales se transfieren mejor que los modelos que utilizan variables ambientales indirectas. Debido a que las variables ambientales pueden ser fácilmente interpretadas, y pueden ser directamente afectadas por gestores de recursos, estos modelos pueden ser herramientas útiles para guiar la gestión de reservas para especies determinadas.

Ancillary