Recovery of Endemic Dragonflies after Removal of Invasive Alien Trees

Authors

  • MICHAEL J. SAMWAYS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Conservation Ecology and Entomology and Centre for Invasion Biology, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland, 7602, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • NORMA J. SHARRATT

    1. Department of Conservation Ecology and Entomology and Centre for Invasion Biology, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland, 7602, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author

email samways@sun.ac.za

Abstract

Abstract: Because dragonflies are very sensitive to alien trees, we assessed their response to large-scale restoration of riparian corridors. We compared three types of disturbance regime—alien invaded, cleared of alien vegetation, and natural vegetation (control)—and recorded data on 22 environmental variables. The most significant variables in determining dragonfly assemblages were percentage of bank cover and tree canopy cover, which indicates the importance of vegetation architecture for these dragonflies. This finding suggests that it is important to restore appropriate marginal vegetation and sunlight conditions. Recovery of dragonfly assemblages after the clearing of alien trees was substantial. Species richness and abundance at restored sites matched those at control sites. Dragonfly assemblage patterns reflected vegetation succession. Thus, initially eurytopic, widespread species were the main beneficiaries of the removal of alien trees, and stenotopic, endemic species appeared after indigenous vegetation recovered over time. Important indicator species were the two national endemics (Allocnemis leucosticta and Pseudagrion furcigerum), which, along with vegetation type, can be used to monitor return of overall integrity of riparian ecology and to make management decisions. Endemic species as a whole responded positively to restoration, which suggests that indigenous vegetation recovery has major benefits for irreplaceable and widespread generalist species.

Abstract

Resumen: Debido a que las libélulas son muy sensibles a los árboles exóticos, evaluamos su respuesta a la restauración a gran escala de corredores ribereños. Comparamos tres tipos de régimen de perturbación – vegetación invadida por exóticas, vegetación liberada de exóticas y vegetación natural (control) – con datos registrados sobre 22 variables ambientales. Las variables más significantes para la determinación de los ensambles de libélulas fueron el porcentaje de cobertura ribereña y la cobertura del dosel de árboles, lo que indica la importancia de la arquitectura de la vegetación sobres estas libélulas. Este hallazgo sugiere que es importante restaurar las condiciones de la vegetación de las márgenes y la intensidad solar. La recuperación de los ensambles de libélulas después de la remoción de los árboles exóticos fue sustancial. La riqueza y abundancia de especies en los sitios restaurados fueron iguales que en los sitios control. Los patrones del ensamble de libélulas reflejaron la sucesión de la vegetación. Por lo tanto, especies inicialmente euritópicas, de distribución amplia, fueron las beneficiarias principales de la remoción de árboles exóticos, y las especies estenotípicas, endémicas, aparecieron después de la recuperación de la vegetación nativa. Dos especies indicadoras importantes fueron las endémicas (Allocnemis leucosticta y Pseudagrion furcigerum), que junto con el tipo de vegetación pueden ser utilizadas para monitorear el retorno de la integridad de la ecología ribereña y tomar decisiones de manejo. Las especies endémicas respondieron positivamente a la restauración, lo que sugiera que la recuperación de la vegetación nativa tiene beneficios mayores para especies generalistas irreemplazables y de distribución amplia.

Ancillary