Mapping Human and Social Dimensions of Conservation Opportunity for the Scheduling of Conservation Action on Private Land

Authors

  • ANDREW T. KNIGHT,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Botany, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031, South Africa
      Current address: Department of Conservation Ecology and Entomology, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, South Africa, email tawnyfrogmouth@gmail.com
    Search for more papers by this author
  • RICHARD M. COWLING,

    1. Department of Botany, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • MARK DIFFORD,

    1. Department of Botany, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • BRUCE M. CAMPBELL

    1. CGIAR Challenge Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Department of Agriculture and Ecology, Faculty of Life Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 21, 1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
    Search for more papers by this author

Current address: Department of Conservation Ecology and Entomology, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, South Africa, email tawnyfrogmouth@gmail.com

Abstract

Abstract Spatial prioritization techniques are applied in conservation-planning initiatives to allocate conservation resources. Although typically they are based on ecological data (e.g., species, habitats, ecological processes), increasingly they also include nonecological data, mostly on the vulnerability of valued features and economic costs of implementation. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of conservation actions implemented through conservation-planning initiatives is a function of the human and social dimensions of social-ecological systems, such as stakeholders’ willingness and capacity to participate. We assessed human and social factors hypothesized to define opportunities for implementing effective conservation action by individual land managers (those responsible for making day-to-day decisions on land use) and mapped these to schedule implementation of a private land conservation program. We surveyed 48 land managers who owned 301 land parcels in the Makana Municipality of the Eastern Cape province in South Africa. Psychometric statistical and cluster analyses were applied to the interview data so as to map human and social factors of conservation opportunity across a landscape of regional conservation importance. Four groups of landowners were identified, in rank order, for a phased implementation process. Furthermore, using psychometric statistical techniques, we reduced the number of interview questions from 165 to 45, which is a preliminary step toward developing surrogates for human and social factors that can be developed rapidly and complemented with measures of conservation value, vulnerability, and economic cost to more-effectively schedule conservation actions. This work provides conservation and land management professionals direction on where and how implementation of local-scale conservation should be undertaken to ensure it is feasible.

Abstract

Resumen: Las técnicas de priorización espacial son aplicadas a las iniciativas de planificación de la conservación para asignar recursos a la conservación. Aunque se basan típicamente en datos ecológicos (e. g., especies, hábitats, procesos ecológicos), incluyen datos no ecológicos cada vez más, principalmente sobre la vulnerabilidad de atributos valiosos y los costos económicos de su implementación. Sin embargo, la efectividad de las acciones de conservación implementadas por medio de iniciativas de planificación de la conservación es una función de las dimensiones humanas y sociales de los sistemas sociales-ecológicos, como disponibilidad y capacidad de los sectores interesados para participar. Evaluamos los factores humanos y sociales hipotetizados para definir las oportunidades para la implementación de acciones de conservación efectivas por manejadores de tierras individuales (aquellos responsables de las decisiones cotidianas sobre uso de suelo) y las mapeamos para programar la implementación de un programa de conservación en tierras privadas. Muestreamos a 48 manejadores de tierras propietarios de 301 parcelas en la Municipalidad de Makana en la provincia Oriental del Cabo en Sudáfrica. Aplicamos análisis cluster y estadística psicométrica a los datos de las entrevistas para mapear los factores humanos y sociales de la oportunidad de conservación en un paisaje de importancia de conservación regional. Identificamos cuatro grupos de propietarios, en orden de importancia, para un proceso de implementación por fases. Más aun, mediante técnicas estadísticas psicométricas, redujimos el número de preguntas de 165 a 45, que es un paso preliminar hacia el desarrollo de sustitutos para los factores humanos y sociales que pueden ser desarrollados rápidamente y complementados con medidas de valor de conservación. Este trabajo proporciona a los profesionales de la conservación y del manejo de tierras directrices sobre dónde y cómo se debe implementar la conservación a escala local para asegurar que sea factible.

Ancillary