Effects of Harvesting Flowers from Shrubs on the Persistence and Abundance of Wild Shrub Populations at Multiple Spatial Extents

Authors

  • JULIANO SARMENTO CABRAL,

    Corresponding author
    1. Plant Ecology and Nature Conservation, Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, University of Potsdam, Maulbeerallee 2, 14469 Potsdam, Germany
      Current address: Biodiversity, Macroecology and Conservation Biogeography Working Group, Büsgenweg 2, 37077 Göttingen, Germany, email jsarmen@uni-goettingen.de, jscabral@gmx.de
    Search for more papers by this author
  • WILLIAM J. BOND,

    1. Department of Botany, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7700 Cape Town, Republic of South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • GUY F. MIDGLEY,

    1. South African National Biodiversity Institute, 7735 Cape Town, Republic of South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • ANTHONY G. REBELO,

    1. South African National Biodiversity Institute, 7735 Cape Town, Republic of South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • WILFRIED THUILLER,

    1. Laboratoire d’Ecologie Alpine, UMR CNRS 5553, Université J. Fourier, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • FRANK M. SCHURR

    1. Plant Ecology and Nature Conservation, Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, University of Potsdam, Maulbeerallee 2, 14469 Potsdam, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author

Current address: Biodiversity, Macroecology and Conservation Biogeography Working Group, Büsgenweg 2, 37077 Göttingen, Germany, email jsarmen@uni-goettingen.de, jscabral@gmx.de

Abstract

Abstract: Wildflower harvesting is an economically important activity of which the ecological effects are poorly understood. We assessed how harvesting of flowers affects shrub persistence and abundance at multiple spatial extents. To this end, we built a process-based model to examine the mean persistence and abundance of wild shrubs whose flowers are subject to harvest (serotinous Proteaceae in the South African Cape Floristic Region). First, we conducted a general sensitivity analysis of how harvesting affects persistence and abundance at nested spatial extents. For most spatial extents and combinations of demographic parameters, persistence and abundance of flowering shrubs decreased abruptly once harvesting rate exceeded a certain threshold. At larger extents, metapopulations supported higher harvesting rates before their persistence and abundance decreased, but persistence and abundance also decreased more abruptly due to harvesting than at smaller extents. This threshold rate of harvest varied with species’ dispersal ability, maximum reproductive rate, adult mortality, probability of extirpation or local extinction, strength of Allee effects, and carrying capacity. Moreover, spatial extent interacted with Allee effects and probability of extirpation because both these demographic properties affected the response of local populations to harvesting more strongly than they affected the response of metapopulations. Subsequently, we simulated the effects of harvesting on three Cape Floristic Region Proteaceae species and found that these species reacted differently to harvesting, but their persistence and abundance decreased at low rates of harvest. Our estimates of harvesting rates at maximum sustainable yield differed from those of previous investigations, perhaps because researchers used different estimates of demographic parameters, models of population dynamics, and spatial extent than we did. Good demographic knowledge and careful identification of the spatial extent of interest increases confidence in assessments and monitoring of the effects of harvesting. Our general sensitivity analysis improved understanding of harvesting effects on metapopulation dynamics and allowed qualitative assessment of the probability of extirpation of poorly studied species.

Abstract

Resumen: La cosecha de flores silvestres es una actividad económica importante de la cual se conoce poco de sus efectos ecológicos. Evaluamos el efecto de la cosecha de flores sobre la persistencia y abundancia de arbustos en escalas espaciales múltiples. Para este fin, construimos un modelo basado en procesos para examinar la persistencia y abundancia media de arbustos silvestres cuyas flores son sujetas a cosecha (Proteaceae serotinoso en la Región Florística Cabo de Sudáfrica). Primero, realizamos un análisis de sensibilidad general del efecto de la cosecha sobre la persistencia y abundancia en extensiones espaciales anidadas. La persistencia y abundancia de arbustos decreció abruptamente una vez que la tasa de cosecha excedió cierto umbral en la mayoría de las extensiones espaciales y combinaciones de parámetros demográficos. En extensiones mayores, las metapoblaciones soportaron tasas de cosecha altas antes de que su persistencia y abundancia decrecieran, pero la persistencia y abundancia también decrecieron más abruptamente debido a la cosecha que en las extensiones más pequeñas. Este umbral en la tasa de cosecha varió con la habilidad de dispersión de las especies, la tasa reproductiva máxima, la probabilidad de extirpación o extinción local, la intensidad de los efectos Allee y la capacidad de carga. Más aun, la extensión espacial interactuó con los efectos Allee y la probabilidad de extirpación debido a que ambos atributos demográficos tuvieron mayor efecto sobre la respuesta de poblaciones locales que sobre la respuesta de metapoblaciones. Subsecuentemente, simulamos los efectos de la cosecha sobre 3 especies de Proteaceae de la Región Florística del Cabo y encontramos que estas especies reaccionaron de manera diferente a la cosecha, pero su persistencia y abundancia decreció a tasas de cosecha menores. Nuestras estimaciones de las tasas de cosecha en la producción máxima sostenible fueron diferentes a las de investigaciones previas, quizá debido a que los investigadores utilizaron estimaciones de parámetros demográficos, modelos de dinámica poblacional y extensiones espaciales diferentes a las usadas por nosotros. Un buen conocimiento demográfico y la identificación cuidadosa de la extensión espacial de interés incrementan la confianza en evaluaciones y monitoreo de los efectos de la cosecha. Nuestro análisis de sensibilidad general mejoró el entendimiento de los efectos de la cosecha sobre la dinámica metapoblacional y permitió una evaluación cualitativa de la probabilidad de extirpación de especies poco estudiadas.

Ancillary